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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 152 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 100 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 92 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 79 1 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 67 1 Browse Search
John F. Hume, The abolitionists together with personal memories of the struggle for human rights 56 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 46 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 40 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 26 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 29, 1864., [Electronic resource] 25 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler. You can also browse the collection for Salmon P. Chase or search for Salmon P. Chase in all documents.

Your search returned 34 results in 5 document sections:

Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 5: Baltimore and Fortress Monroe. (search)
could not see General Scott until eleven o'clock, I called upon the Secretary of the Treasury, Mr. Chase, at his office in the department. I found him busily engaged in studying a map of Virginia in company with Major McDowell. Chase said to me :-- Look here, General, I want your attention to this matter, pointing to the map. Here is Manassas Junction, where there is the junction of the sysications. Let us go there and form an intrenchment as a nucleus of a very much larger force. Chase appeared impressed by my advice and suggestions and said they were his own, and asked me if I woement was never made, although it was very earnestly pressed upon the President and Cabinet by Mr. Chase. Scott did not consent to have our armies cross the Potomac until the movement in which Ellsweral Scott could not, because of his infirmities, long remain in command of the army. I saw Mr. Chase, the Secretary of the Treasury, and I told him the same thing. With many expressions of perso
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 12: administration of finances, politics, and justice.--recall. (search)
ectfully, Benj. F. Butler, Major-General Commanding. War Records, Vol. XV., p. 514. headquarters Department of the Gulf, New Orleans, La., July 2, 1862. Hon. Salmon P. Chase, Secretary of the Treasury: Sir:--Will be found inclosed herewith minutes of the doings of a commission to inquire into the seizure of the specie of Same treasury notes above mentioned, and a like amount of bullion to await the decision. Benjamin F. Butler, Major-General Commanding. Shortly after, I sent to Mr. Chase the sum of $245,760, being the amount of Confederate funds paid over in cash by the several banks. I specified the source from which the money came — Confederathat does this mean? Seward at Washington, pp. 146, 147. Preston King, who was there, explained to the President. Thereupon such proceedings were had that Chase, who was supposed to be a leader of the radical party in the Cabinet, also was persuaded to resign. Then, both the Secretary of the Treasury and the Secretary of
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 14: in command of the Army of the James. (search)
residential election of 1864 both Lincoln and Chase offer Butler the Vice-presidency embarkation cipation as one of the terms of peace. Secretary Chase was making a very strenuous endeavor to bsidential aspirations. What do you think of Mr. Chase's action, assuming that he does so? I see he has to further a laudable ambition. As Chase is a Western man, he continued, had not the Vio you think would make a good candidate with Mr. Chase? There are plenty of good men, I answereal, said he; would you take that position with Chase, yourself? Are you authorized by Mr. Chase Mr. Chase to put this question to me and report my answer to him for his consideration? You may rest assured, was the reply; I am fully empowered by Mr. Chase to put the question, and he hopes the answer . Lincoln's renomination was assured. Is Mr. Chase making any headway in his candidature? I as You see I think it is Lincoln's fault and not Chase's that he is using the treasury against Lincol[4 more...]
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 20: Congressman and Governor. (search)
according to the forms of the English law,--or as Judge Chase had been tried when Aaron Burr presided over the debt would be paid in gold was in the answer of Secretary Chase to a letter sent him from abroad — Frankfort, Is sent over here as a stock-jobbing proposition to Mr. Chase. How did he answer it? Through his assistant secrty notes was made on the 18th of May, 1862, by Salmon P. Chase, Secretary of the Treasury, in these words:-- end from Maine [Mr. Blaine]. I did not say that Salmon P. Chase was not guilty of the same thing; I only said tof it; that is the distinction. [Laughter.] If Salmon P. Chase had broken the faith of this government — if hen we paid gold to meet all our obligations — if Salmon P. Chase, on the 18th of May, 1864, when called upon to e first repudiator? The gentleman chooses to cite Mr. Chase as the promisor of this bad note. Be it so; I am e it with what was the circulation before the war. Mr. Chase reported the circulation of this country before th<
Charlestown, opposed to annexation act, 1000-1002. Charleston Mercury edited Clapp, former teacher of Butler, 56; blockade runners enter harbor, 849. Chase, Judge, reference to, 929. Chase, Salmon P., Secretary of Treasury, consultations with, 222-223, 240; acknowledges Butler's financial ability, 517-518; receives fuChase, Salmon P., Secretary of Treasury, consultations with, 222-223, 240; acknowledges Butler's financial ability, 517-518; receives funds from Butler, 520; Lincoln persuades him to withdraw resignation, 537; presidential aspirations of, 631-633; letter in regard to bonds, 936; reply, 936; three year seven-thirty treasury notes, 937; report on finance, 948; in the Farragut prize case, 1010-1012. Chattanooga, battle of, reference to, 715. Chemistry, Butler's, 577-579; unwilling to punish desertion with death, 579-580; minor references to, 141, 500; interview with upon return from New Orleans, 533; persuades Seward and Chase to withdraw resignations, 537; offers Butler Grant's command on the Mississippi, 549, 551; asks Butler to enroll slaves, 568,570; the unwise clemency of, 620; give