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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 68 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 40 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 16 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Irene E. Jerome., In a fair country 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Oldport days, with ten heliotype illustrations from views taken in Newport, R. I., expressly for this work. 6 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 5. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 6 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 4 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James Russell Lowell, Among my books. You can also browse the collection for Chaucer or search for Chaucer in all documents.

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James Russell Lowell, Among my books, Dante. (search)
anding and facilitating the study of the poet. In England the first recognition of Dante is by Chaucer in the Hugelin of Pisa of the Monkes Tale, It is worth notice, as a proof of Chaucer's critiChaucer's critical judgment, that he calls Dante the great poet of Itaille, while in the Clerke's Tale he speaks of Petrarch as a worthy clerk, as the laureat poete (alluding to the somewhat sentimental ceremony atrvey, See Field's Theory of Colors. and one might as well attempt to dethrone Newton because Chaucer speaks of the love which draws the apple to the earth. The truth is, that it was only as a poe, 1309; Templars suppressed, 1312; Boccaccio born, 1313; Dante died, 1321; Wycliffe born, 1324; Chaucer born, 1328. The range of Dante's influence is not less remarkable than its intensity. Mindser, who had, like Dante, a Platonizing side, and who was probably the first English poet since Chaucer that had read the Comnmedia, has imitated the pictorial part of these passages in the Faerie Qu
James Russell Lowell, Among my books, Spenser (search)
Spenser Chaucer had been in his grave one hundred and fifty years ere England bad secreted chre, intelligible English, which was spoken in Chaucer's time, and is spoken in ours; equally unders are after they are wrought. Spenser, like Chaucer a Londoner, was born in 1553. Mr. Hales, ie was buried in the neighboring Abbey next to Chaucer, at the cost of the Earl of Essex, poets bearoverlooks the whole chasm between himself and Chaucer, as Dante between himself and Virgil. He called Chaucer master, as Milton was afterwards to call him. And, even while he chose the most artificut for manner he instinctively turned back to Chaucer, the first and then only great English poet. g hitherto displayed by no English poet since Chaucer. Surrey had brought back from Italy a certaig and move to measures harmonious and noble. Chaucer had done much to vocalize it, as I have triedat wiseacres used to call the riding-rhyme of Chaucer, he fails most lamentably. He had evidently
James Russell Lowell, Among my books, Wordsworth. (search)
d in The Prelude. He did not distinguish himself as a scholar, and if his life had any incidents, they were of that interior kind which rarely appear in biography, though they may be of controlling influence upon the life. He speaks of reading Chaucer, Spenser, and Milton while at Cambridge, Prelude, Book III. He studied Italian also at Cambridge; his teacher, whose name was Isola, had formerly taught the poet Gray. It may be pretty certainly inferred, however, that his first systematic ge owes him gratitude for the habitual purity and abstinence of his style, and we who speak it, for having emboldened us to take delight in simple things, and to trust ourselves to our own instincts. And he hath his reward. It needs not to bid Renowned Chaucer lie a thought more nigh To rare Beaumond, and learned Beaumond lie A little nearer Spenser; for there is no fear of crowding in that little society with whom he is now enrolled as fifth in the succession of the great English Poets.
James Russell Lowell, Among my books, Keats. (search)
temperament was we can see clearly, and also that it subordinated itself more and more to the discipline of art. John Keats, the second of four children, like Chaucer and Spenser, was a Londoner, but, unlike them, he was certainly not of gentle blood. Lord Houghton, who seems to have had a kindly wish to create him gentleman bvulgar Blackwood and Quarterly standard, which measured genius by genealogies. It is enough that his poetical pedigree is of the best, tracing through Spenser to Chaucer, and that Pegasus does not stand at livery even in the largest establishments in Moorfields. As well as we can make out, then, the father of Keats was a groom as could be felt only by a poet, and which true poetry only could have excited.—J. H. C., in Notes & Queries, 4th s. x. 157. Before long we find him studying Chaucer, then Shakespeare, and afterward Milton. But Chapman's translations had a more abiding influence on his style both for good and evil. That he read wisely, his c