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Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 4 0 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 4 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 3 3 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 3 1 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 1, April, 1902 - January, 1903 3 1 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 24, 1865., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 16, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Caroline E. Whitcomb, History of the Second Massachusetts Battery of Light Artillery (Nims' Battery): 1861-1865, compiled from records of the Rebellion, official reports, diaries and rosters 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874.. You can also browse the collection for Chauncey or search for Chauncey in all documents.

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C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Eighth: the war of the Rebellion. (search)
England England owed us no good-will plain letter to Lord John Russell his unworthy conduct England our step-mother Sumner for Colored troops author's historic statement negro troops in Washington's army Colored heroes at red Bank Commodore Chauncey's Black sailors Gen. Jackson's Proclamation in 1814 Jackson's Address to Colored troops advantages of Colored soldiers 180,000 Colored troops in the Union army Senator Arnold on public defence improvement in the Colored race an evenigs had informed him additional numbers of blacks were required to man the ships, this class of persons having proved highly valuable in the naval service. in our navy, and their names always entered on the ships' books without distinction. Commodore Chauncey thus speaks:— I regret that you are not pleased with the men sent you by Messrs. Champlin and Forrest, for, to my knowledge, a part of them are not surpassed by any seamen we have in the fleet; and 1 have yet to learn that the color of t
was apprehensive if arms were placed in the hands of blacks that they would commit great barbarities. What, he asked,—replying to that remark,— had become of the Christian teachings which were said to prevail in the South? He said that General Meigs had informed him additional numbers of blacks were required to man the ships, this class of persons having proved highly valuable in the naval service. in our navy, and their names always entered on the ships' books without distinction. Commodore Chauncey thus speaks:— I regret that you are not pleased with the men sent you by Messrs. Champlin and Forrest, for, to my knowledge, a part of them are not surpassed by any seamen we have in the fleet; and 1 have yet to learn that the color of the skin, or the cut and trimmings of the coat, can affect a man's qualifications or usefulness. I have nearly fifty blacks on board of this ship, and many of them are among my best men. In October, 1814, the State of New York passed an act to aut<