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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 20 0 Browse Search
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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 19: battle of Chickamauga (search)
of Tenn., Gen. Bragg, Sept. 19--20, 1863 corpsDIVISIONSBRIGADESBATTERIES PolkCheathamJackson, Smith, Maney, Wright, Strahl5 HindmanAnderson, Deas, Manigault3 Hill right under Polk, and the left under Longstreet. To Polk's wing was assigned Cheatham's division of his corps, and the corps of Hill and Walker, with the cavalry un the whole command of Polk in charge of the right wing, except the division of Cheatham which contained five brigades. Why neither Bragg or Polk put them in until afke no more part than the left wing has taken in the battle of the morning, and Cheatham's division will practically take none at all. About 11 A. M., Bragg, findinhowever, was discouraged, and said there was no fight left in the right wing. Cheatham's division had not been engaged. Longstreet's account of the interview stat19--20, 1863 corps and DIVISIONBRIGADEKILLED wounded MISSINGTOTALstrength Polk Cheatham Jackson5543054901,405 Smith4026073071,200 Maney54315153841,177 Wright44
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 23: the fall of 1864 (search)
ry. So much in explanation of Hood's campaign. The issue at stake was now lost by the non-compliance with orders of Gen. Cheatham, commanding one of Hood's corps. Schofield had taken position on the north side of Duck River, opposing Hood's cros corps to demonstrate against Schofield, while he threw a pontoon bridge across the river three miles above and crossed Cheatham's and Stewart's corps which marched to Spring Hill on the Franklin pike, 12 miles in Schofield's rear, arriving about 3 lace was held by the 2d division of the 4th corps, about 4000 strong; Hood's force was about 18,000 infantry. Hood took Cheatham with Cleburne, a division commander, within sight of the pike, along which the enemy could now be seen retreating at dou into action himself. In his book, he calls the opportunity the best move in my career as a soldier. A few days after, Cheatham frankly admitted his delinquency. It was rumored that both he and Gen. Stewart had that evening absented themselves fro