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John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 179 35 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 85 3 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 65 9 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 49 1 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 47 3 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 46 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 45 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 42 0 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 39 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 39 23 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Cheatham or search for Cheatham in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 54: capture of Richmond.--the destruction of the Confederate fleet in the James River, etc. (search)
ld be demanded of General Lee when Grant should move on Petersburg and Richmond. President Lincoln, being no longer able to restrain his anxiety, now proceeded to City Point, and would doubtless have been joined by the members of the Cabinet had he not expressly forbidden it. Besides the troops under the command of General J. E. Johnston, Sherman had some of the ablest generals in the Confederacy to contest his march. General Beauregard had been reinforced at Charlotte, N. C., by General Cheatham and the garrison of Augusta, and was moving towards Raleigh. General Hardee. with the troops from Savannah and Charleston, was marching towards the same point, as were General Bragg and Hoke from Wilmington; so that it appeared as if Sherman would encounter an army of eighty thousand men, commanded by one who was considered by many competent judges the ablest of the Confederate generals. There was certainly no general on the other side for whose abiliities Sherman had so great a respe