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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for R. C. Chenault or search for R. C. Chenault in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Eleventh Kentucky Cavalry, C. S. A. From the Lexington, Ky. Herald, April 21, 1907. (search)
for any political office. He served in the Mexican War as a subaltern in Captain J. C. Stone's company of Colonel Humphrey Marshall's First Kentucky Cavalry. He married Tabitha Phelps, of Madison County, but they never had any children. After his death his widow married William Todd, formerly of Missouri, who had been a captain in Quantrell's command. Colonel Chenault was buried on the battlefield at Green River Bridge, but in a few days his remains were taken up by his brother, Dr. R. C. Chenault, and carried to Madison County and reinterred in the old family burying-ground. In 1901, thirty-nine years later, his remains were again exhumed, and reinterred in the Richmond Cemetery. On this occasion the undertaker opened the coffin and found that, owing to some peculiarity of the soil in which it had been buried for nearly forty years, the body was still perfectly preserved, as though death had ensued only the day before, and the features of the face were still as perfect as in
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Roster of the companies. (search)
Roster of the companies. Company A. John Henry Jackson was largely instrumental in recruiting this, the first company raised for Chenault's Regiment. It was recruited in Clark County, at a meeting and barbecue given on the farm of Mr. Jackson's mother, at Jackson's Ferry, on Friday, September 2, 1862, where Colonel Tucker and Major McCreary made speeches. An eye witness of the scene writes: When Colonel Tucker and Major McCreary spoke at Jackson's Ferry, they stood on the balcony of the residence of the venerable Mrs. Anna Jackson. A beautiful daughter of this historic family, Miss Mary Virginia Jackson, waved over their heads a Confederate flag. Full of life, beauty and enthusiasm, her cheering voice would ring out Fall in boys, the South needs you, and the boys fell in. Mrs. Jackson and her lovely daughter were afterwards arrested for giving aid and comfort to the Rebellion, and were incarcerated in a military prison. On their release they were put under heavy bonds. M