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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 53 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Joseph Lemuel Chester or search for Joseph Lemuel Chester in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Agreement of the people, (search)
re, with the City of Lichfield, the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, 6. Shropshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except Shrewsbury, 6; Shrewsbury, 1. Cheshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except Chester, 5; Chester, 2. Lancashire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except Manchester, 6; Manchester and the Parish, 1. Yorkshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except such as are hereafter named, 15; York City anChester, 2. Lancashire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except Manchester, 6; Manchester and the Parish, 1. Yorkshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except such as are hereafter named, 15; York City and the County thereof, 3; Kingston upon Hull and the County thereof, 1; Leeds Town and Parish, 1. Durham County Palatine, with the Boroughs. Towns, and Parishes therein, except Durham and Gateside, 3; Durham City, 1. Northumberland, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except such as are hereunder named, 3; Newcastle upon Tyne and the County thereof, with Gateside, 2; Berwick, 1. Cumberland, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, 3. Westmoreland, with the Borough
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Brandywine, battle on the. (search)
, checked their pursuers; and at a narrow defile the regiments of Stephen and Stewart held the British back until night, when the latter encamped. In the mean time, Knyphausen had crossed at Chad's Ford and attacked the left wing under Wayne. After a gallant fight, the latter, seeing the British gaining his rear, abandoned his cannon and munitions of war and made a disorderly retreat behind the division of Greene. At twilight there was a skirmish near Dilworth between Maxwell and his light troops, lying in ambush to cover the retreat of the Americans, and some British grenadiers. The contest was brief, for darkness put an end to it. The Americans, defeated, marched leisurely to Chester; for the British, who held the field, did not pursue. The next morning (Sept. 12, 1777) Washington gathered his broken army, marched towards Philadelphia, and encamped near Germantown. It was estimated that the Americans lost, in killed, wounded, and prisoners, about 1,200; the British, about 800.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Burke, Edmund, 1730-1797 (search)
ilar case before me; those of Ireland, Wales, Chester, and Durham. Ireland, before the English c The very same year the county palatine of Chester received the same relief from its oppression,me remedy to its disorders. Before this time Chester was little less distempered than Wales. The nhabitants of your Grace's county palatine of Chester; That where the said county palatine of ChestChester is and hath been always hitherto exempt. excluded and separated out and from your high court ofemedy for superstition. Sir, this pattern of Chester was followed in the reign of Charles II. witlation. So scrupulously was the example of Chester followed, that the style of the preamble is nard to America; was it less perfect in Wales, Chester, and Durham? But America is virtually represles, which lies in your neighborhood; or than Chester and Durham, surrounded by abundance of represich was preserved entire, although Wales, and Chester, and Durham were added to it. Truly, Mr. Spea[1 more...]
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Census, United States (search)
ash37,71436,0061,708 Haverhill, Mass. 37,17527,4129,763 Spokane. Wash36,84819,92216,926 Terre Haute, Ind.36,67330,2176,456 Dubuque, Ia 36,29730,3115,986 Quincy, Ill. 36,25231,4944,758 South Bend, Ind.35,99921,81914,180 Salem, Mass. 35,95630,8015,155 Johnstown, Pa35,93621,80514,131 Elmira, N. Y 35,67230,8934,779 Allentown, Pa 35,41625,22810,188 Davenport, Ia35,25426,8728,382 McKeesport, Pa 34,22720,74113,486 Springfield. Ill.34,15924,9639,196 Chelsea, Mass. 34,07227,9096,163 Chester, Pa33,98820,22613,762 York, Pa33,70820,79312,915 Malden, Mass.33,66423,03110,633 Topeka, Kan33.60831,0072,601 Newton, Mass.33,58724,3799,208 Sioux City, la33,11137,806*4,695 Bayonne, N. J.32,72219,03313,689 Knoxville, Tenn32,63722,53510,102 Chattanooga, Tenn32,49029,1003,390 Schenectady, N. Y 31,53119,90211,780 Fitchburg, Mass.31,68222,0379,494 Superior, Wis 31,09111,98319,108 Rockford, Ill. 31,05123,5847,467 Taunton, Mass.31,03625,4485,588 Canton, O 30,66726,1894.478 Butte,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Chester, Joseph Lemuel 1821-1882 (search)
Chester, Joseph Lemuel 1821-1882 (pen name Julian Cramor), antiquarian; born in Norwich, Conn., April 30, 1821; removed to London, England, in 1858, and devoted himself to the history and genealogy of the early settlers in New England. His publications include Educational laws of Virginia; The personal narrative of Mrs. Margaret Douglas; John Rogers (with a genealogy of the family), etc. He died in London, England, May 28, 1882.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Edward vii., Albert Edward, 1841- (search)
Edward vii., Albert Edward, 1841- King of Great Britain and Emperor of India; born in Buckingham Palace, Nov. 9, 1841; eldest son of Queen Victoria and the Prince Consort; created Prince of Wales and Earl of Chester a month after his birth; educated by private tutors, at Christ Church, Oxford, and at Cambridge. In 1860, under the guidance of the Duke of Newcastle, he visited the United States, where he received an enthusiastic welcome. President Buchanan and his official family extended to him a grand entertainment at the national capital, and the cities which he visited vied with one another in paying him high honors. The courtesies so generously extended to him laid the foundation for the strong friendship which he always afterwards manifested for Americans. After this trip he travelled in Germany, Italy, and the Holy Land. In 1863 he married the Princess Alexandra, daughter of Christian IV., King of Denmark, and after his marriage he made prolonged tours in many foreign
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Federal Union, the John Fiske (search)
e. Sir Henry Maine tells us that in Hindustan nearly all the great towns and cities have arisen either from the simple expansion or from the expansion and coalescence of primitive village-communities; and such as have not arisen in this way, including some of the greatest of Indian cities, have grown up about the intrenched camps of the Mogul emperors. Maine, Village communities, 118. The case has been just the same in modern Europe. Some famous cities of England and Germany—such as Chester and Lincoln, Strasburg and Maintz—grew up about the camps of the Roman legions. But in general the Teutonic city has been formed by the expansion and coalescence of thickly peopled townships and hundreds. In the United States nearly all cities have come from the growth and expansion of villages, with such occasional cases of coalescence as that of Boston with Roxbury and Charlestown. Now and then a city has been laid out as a city ab initio, with full consciousness of its purpose, as a m
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Government, instrument of. (search)
om time to time, for the several counties of England, Wales, the Isles of Jersey and Guernsey, and the town of Berwick-upon-Tweed, and all places within the same respectively, shall be according to the proportions and numbers hereafter expressed: that is to say, Bedfordshire, 5; Bedford Town, 1; Berkshire, 5; Abingdon, 1; Reading, 1; Buckinghamshire, 5; Buckingham Town, 1; Aylesbury, 1; Wycomb, 1; Cambridgeshire, 4; Cambridge Town, 1; Cambridge University, 1; Isle of Ely, 2; Cheshire, 4; Chester, 1; Cornwall, 8; Launceston, 1; Truro, 1; Penryn, 1; East Looe and West Looe, 1 Cumberland, 2; Carlisle, 1; Derbyshire, 4 Derby Town, 1; Devonshire, 11; Exeter, 2; Plymouth, 2; Clifton, Dartmouth, Hardness, 1; Totnes, 1; Barnstable, 1; Tiverton, 1; Honiton, 1; Dorsetshire, 6; Dorchester, 1; Weymouth and Melcomb-Regis, 1; Lyme-Regis, 1; Poole, 1; Durham, 2; City of Durham, 1; Essex, 13; Malden, 1; Colchester, 2; Gloucestershire, 5; Gloucester, 2; Tewkesbury, 1; Cirencester, 1; Herefordshire
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Markham, William 1635-1704 (search)
Markham, William 1635-1704 Colonial governor; born in England about 1635. When William Penn, who was his first cousin, secured the charter for Pennsylvania, he appointed him deputy, with power to found courts, dispose of lands, fix boundaries, etc., with the one exception of calling a legislative assembly. He sailed by way of Boston to New York, where, after showing his credentials, the acting governor notified the officials on the Delaware of the transfer of authority. He reached Upland (now Chester), Aug. 3, 1681. Not long after, with a number of surveyors, he chose the site for the city of Philadelphia. In 1691, when the territory which constitutes the present State of Delaware was separated from Pennsylvania, Markham was made deputy governor over it; and in 1694-99 was lieutenant-governor of Pennsylvania, vacating the office on the arrival of a proprietary governor. He died in Philadelphia, Pa., June 12, 1704.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Pennsylvania, (search)
ia, and builds a fort for defence......1643 [First European settlement in Pennsylvania.] Swedes settle Upland (now Chester), first town settled in Pennsylvania......1643 Dutch from New York capture the Swedish forts on the Delaware, and takwenty-three ships arrive in the Delaware this year with colonists for Pennsylvania.] Penn reaches Upland and calls it Chester......Oct. 29, 1682 Spacious brick residence built at a cost of £ 7,000 for Penn on Pennsbury Manor, opposite Burlingtited with Pennsylvania on the basis of equal rights, and a code called the great law was enacted.] Counties of Bucks, Chester, and Philadelphia organized......December, 1682 Penn attends to laying out Philadelphia......December, 1682 Penn makers are appointed for each county......March 10, 1683 Weekly post established (letters carried from Philadelphia to Chester, 2d.; to New Castle, 4d.; to Maryland, 6d.)......July, 1683 First mill built at Chester......1683 Franfort Land Co
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