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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 1 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Edward Cheves or search for Edward Cheves in all documents.

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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
the north of the river, and had nearly cleared a passage when detected. Tattnall then came down to the mouth of the Wright river and drove off the working party. The Federals also sought to use a channel leading up from the south, from Warsaw sound, through Wilmington river and St. Augustine creek to the Savannah just below Fort Jackson. An attack by this route had been foreseen and guarded against by the erection of a battery on a small island opposite Fort Jackson, which in honor of Dr. Cheves, who superintended its construction, was called Fort Cheves, and mounted some long 32-pounders from Norfolk navy yard. Fire rafts were also prepared. One of these, completed about Christmas, was cut loose by a traitor and floated down unlighted to Tybee beach, the Federal position. The main object of the expedition to Tybee island was to escort Gen. Quincy A. Gillmore, chief engineer of the Federal corps at Hilton Head. His purpose was to prepare batteries for the reduction of Fort Pul
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: (search)
Col. L. J. Parr, in command of the Thirty-eighth, lost an arm, and Maj. J. D. Matthews was dangerously wounded. Col. C. A. Evans, commanding the Thirty-first regiment, and leading, in the charge on the left, his own and the Thirty-eighth regiment after their separation from the brigade, received a slight wound, and a number of other officers were killed or wounded. The losses among rank and file were very heavy, showing the desperate character of their charge. Early in the action, Capt. Edward Cheves, volunteer aide to General Lawton, lost his horse, but he went into battle on foot and fell pierced through the heart by a rifle ball. Though a mere youth, he had exhibited a degree of zeal, intelligence and gallantry worthy of praise, and not one who fell on that bloody field has brought more sorrow to the hearts of those who knew him best. The loss of the brigade in this battle of Gaines' Mill was as follows: Thirteenth, 6 killed, 54 wounded; Sixtieth, 3 killed, 1 wounded; Twenty-