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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 12 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 8 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 8 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 2 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 9, 1863., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 14, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 2 Browse Search
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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 4: seditious movements in Congress.--Secession in South Carolina, and its effects. (search)
mittee was composed of Robert Barnwell Rhett, John Alfred Calhoun, W. P. Finley, Isaac D. I Wilson, W. F De Saussure, Langdon Cheves, and Merrick E. Carn. another to draft a declaration of the causes that impelled and justified the secession of Southpson.P. E. Duncan.William Hunter.Jos. E. Jenkins.Simpson Bobo. Benjamin Franklin Mauldin.W. K. Easley.Andrew F. Luis.Langdon Cheves.William Curtis. Lewis Malone Ayer, Jr.James Harrison.Robert A. Thompson.Georde Rhodes.H. D. Green. W. Peronneau Fin-All the revenue and postal laws, repeated Mr. Gregg, fell to the ground on the passage of the Ordinance of Secession. Mr. Cheves declared, to avoid inconvenience to the people, temporary arrangements must be adopted for carrying on the Government. al affairs, and that things must for the present remain in status quo, or confusion will arise. Mr. Mazyck agreed with Cheves and others,: that the duties of collectors and postmasters in South Carolina were extinguished. He was favorable to an a
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cheves, Langdon 1776-1857 (search)
Cheves, Langdon 1776-1857 Statesman; born in Abbeville District, S. C., Sept. 17, 1776. Admitted to the bar in 1800, he soon became eminent as a lawyer and as a leader in the State legislature, which he entered in 1808. He was attorney-general of the State, and was a member of Congress from 1811 to 1816, zealously supporting all war measures introduced. When, in 1814, Henry Clay was sent to negotiate a treaty of peace with Great Britain, he succeeded the Kentuckian as speaker of the House, which place he held for a year, his casting vote defeating a bill for the rechartering of the United States Bank. The bank was rechartered in 1816; and when in trouble in 1819 Cheves was appointed president of its directors, and by his great energy and keen judgment it was saved from dissolution. He became chief commissioner under the treaty of Ghent for settling some of its provisions. He was a public advocate of disunion as early as the year 1830, but opposed nullification (q. v.). He d
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hayne, Robert young -1839 (search)
Hayne, Robert young -1839 Statesman; born near Charleston, S. C., Nov. 10, 1791; was admitted to the bar in 1812; and when his law tutor, Langdon Cheves, went to Congress he succeeded to his large practice. He rose rapidly, and in 1818 was attorneygeneral of South Carolina. He was United States Senator from 1823 to 1832, and was distinguished as an orator. In the latter year he and Daniel Webster had their famous debate on the tariff, during which Hayne declared the right of a State to nullify acts of the national government. In a State convention he drew up the ordinance of nullification; and when, the next year, he was governor of South Carolina, he maintained that right, and prepared for armed resistance. Clay's compromise allayed the fierce dispute. He died in Asheville, N. C., Sept. 24, 1839. See nullification; Webster, Daniel. Speech on Foote's resolution. On Jan. 21 and 25, 1830, Senator Hayne opened the great debate with Daniel Webster with the following spee
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Speaker of Congress, the (search)
opportunities to do service. Speakers of the House of Congress. Congress.Years.Name.State.Born.Died. 11789-91F. A. MuhlenburgPennsylvania 17501801 21791-93Jonathan TrumbullConnecticut17401809 31793-95F. A. MuhlenburgPennsylvania 17501801 4, 51795-99Jonathan DaytonNew Jersey17601824 61799-1801Theo. SedgwickMassachusetts17461813 7-91801-07Nathaniel MaconNorth Carolina17571837 10, 111807-11Joseph B. VarnumMasssachusetts17501821 12, 131811-14Henry ClayKentucky 17771852 131814-15Langdon ChevesSouth Carolina17761857 14-161815-20Henry ClayKentucky17771852 161820-21John W. TaylorNew York17841854 171821-23Philip P. BarbourVirginia17831841 181823-25Henry ClayKentucky17771852 191825-27John W. TaylorNew York17841854 20-231827-34Andrew StevensonVirginia17841857 231834-35John BellTennessee 17971869 24, 251835-39James K. PolkTennessee17951849 261839-41R. M. T. HunterVirginia18091887 271841-43John WhiteKentucky18051845 281843-45John W. JonesVirginia18051848 291845-47John W. D
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
of Detroit......Jan. 3, 1814 An English vessel, the Bramble, under a flag of truce, arrives at Annapolis, Md., with offers of peace......Jan. 6, 1814 Congress authorizes increasing the army to 63,000 regular troops, and five years service......January, 1814 Daniel Webster's first speech in the House on the enlistment bill......Jan. 14, 1814 Henry Clay resigns as Speaker of the House......Jan. 19, 1814 [He was appointed one of the peace commissioners, to meet at Ghent.] Langdon Cheves, of South Carolina, elected Speaker......Jan. 19, 1814 Resolution tabled in Congress for a committee to investigate the Blue Lights......Jan. 24, 1814 President transmits to the House a report from the Secretary of War explaining the failure of the army on the northern frontier......Feb. 2, 1814 Massachusetts forbids the confinement in her jails of persons not committed by her judicial authorities......Feb. 7, 1814 [The object was to free herself from confining British captiv
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Webster, Daniel 1782-1852 (search)
f they could! But the principal feature, and that which has chiefly elicited these observations, is the renewal of the system of internal improvements. Now this measure was adopted by a vote of 115 to 86, of a Republican Congress, and sanctioned by a Republican President. Who, then, is this author who assumes the high prerogative of denouncing, in the name of the Republican party, the Republican administration of the country— a denunciation including within its sweep Calhoun, Lowndes, and Cheves, men who will be regarded as the brightest ornaments of South Carolina, and the strongest pillars of the Republican party, as long as the late war shall be remembered, and talents and patriotism shall be regarded as the proper objects of the admiration and gratitude of a free people! Such are the opinions, sir, which were maintained by South Carolina gentlemen in the House of Representatives on the subject of internal improvement when I took my seat there as a member from Massachusetts
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 13: results of the work and proofs of its genuineness (search)
aviour, death had no terrors for him. Whatever ties there were to life, he was ready to sacrifice them to his country. That life, which he had freely offered on so many battle-fields, was at last taken in the bloody battle of Gettysburg. The loss is his friends', his fellow-soldiers', his country's–the gain his own! Few have served their country so well; none, we trust, rest more happily from their labors. The same mail brought to Mrs. Haskell the intelligence of the death of Captains Langdon Cheves, Charles T. Haskell, and William T. Haskell, a brother and two sons, one in the vigor of maturity, the others in the prime of youthful manhood. These men, in the language of a public journal which, in this instance at least, gave utterance to the public sentiment— these men were all of the stuff of which heroes are made. They all did the duties of life with earnestness; all died the death of martyrs in a cause to which they had devoted themselves without stint; and of each of the
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
Francis Adams, the first, 198 Charles Sealsfield. See Postl, Karl Charles the Bold, 188 Charlevoix, 179 Charlie's town, 510 Charlotte Temple, 69 Chartres, 490 Chateaubriand, 579, 595 Chatterton, Thomas, 35, 517 Chaucer, 77, 471, 484, 485, 486, 487, 555 Chaucer as a literary artist, 486 Chaucer in literary history, 486 Cheever, Ezekiel, 390, 416, 444 Cheke, Sir, John, 475 Chekhov, 606 Chesterfield, 391 Chevalier of Pensieri-Vani, the, 92 Cheves, Langdon, 341 Chicago (University), 62, 207, 212, 357, 412, 586 Child, F. J., 5, 464, 479, 484-485, 485 n., 486, 507, 509 Child and the curriculum, 423 Children in the Wood, the, 511 Children of earth, 291, 294 Children of the King, the, 88 Chinese characteristics, 212 Chinese repository, 144 Chittenden, H. M., 134, 135 Choate, Rufus, 126 Choir invisible, the, 91 Chopin, Kate, 597 Chorus Lady, the, 295 Christ and Christmas, 531 Christian City, the, 223 Christi
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 17: (search)
War under President Van Buren. Mr. Clay, Mr. Tazewell, Littleton Waller Tazewell, a distinguished lawyer of Virginia, and member of the United States Senate. Mr. Cheves, Langdon Cheves of South Carolina had been Speaker of the House of Representatives in 1815. Mr. King, General Bernard, the Edward Livingstons, General LafayeLangdon Cheves of South Carolina had been Speaker of the House of Representatives in 1815. Mr. King, General Bernard, the Edward Livingstons, General Lafayette, etc. These dinners were as pleasant as anything of the sort could well be, for Mr. Webster was generally very animated, and there was no want of excitement among the rest of them. We often went to a party in the evening, which was almost uniformly a dance, and after that was over came home to a little supper, or went to onf, Colonel Hayne Robert Y. Hayne of South Carolina, born 1791; best known for his debate with Mr. Webster in the United States Senate, in 1830. and his wife, Mr. Cheves, Mr. Archer, Colonel Hamilton, General Mercer, Mr. King, Rufus King, our Minister to Great Britain in 1796; died in 1827 at the age of seventy-two. and so on
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 26 (search)
er, Mr., 443. Channing, Edward T., 9, 12, 26; letters to,. 30, 42, 83, 89, 96, 107, 118, 183. Channing, Dr., Walter, 148, 391; letters to, 94, 149. Channing, Mrs., Walter, letters to, 148, 188. Channing, Rev. William E., 17, 84, 96, 178, 316, 327, 382, 391, 405, 479. Chapman, Dr., 16. Charlottesville, visits, 34, 348. Chastellux, Count de, 109. Chateaubriand, Vte. de, 137-140, 146, 254, 255, 304; Mad. de, 355. Chauncey, Commodore, 373. Cheverus, Bishop, 18 note. Cheves, Langdon, 350, 351. Chirk Castle, 52. Cicognara, Count, 163, 164, 166. Cintra, 245-247; convention of, 246. Circourt, Count Adolphe de, 470 and note, 475 note, 482, 483, 485, 486. Circourt, Countess Anastasie Klustine de, 470 and note, 482, 483, 485, 486. Clare, Lord, 422. Clay, Henry, 350, 381. Clemencin, Diego, 197. Clerk, John, 277, 280. Cloncurry, Lord, 422. Cogswell, Joseph Green, 116, 156, 173, 273, 278 note, 282, 284, 285, 316 note, 318 and note, 332, 336, 385. Cole
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