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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 12 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 8 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 8 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 2 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 9, 1863., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 14, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Langdon Cheves or search for Langdon Cheves in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 13: (search)
rdered the south end of Morris island fortified, that the work was promptly begun, and that when General Ripley complained, May 24th, of its slow progress, Capt. Langdon Cheves, of the engineers, was prosecuting it with an inadequate force, and no wood material furnished, necessary for magazine and bombproof. As a precautionary mthe casualties in the fort were among the Georgia troops. Four monitors, lying a mile off, bombarded Wagner on the 10th, and on the morning of that day, Capt. Langdon Cheves, the engineer of Fort Wagner, just after receiving the intelligence of the death of his gallant kinsman, was killed in the fort by a fragment of shell, fired from one of the monitors, the first shot fired at the fort that day. Captain Cheves was an accomplished engineer, a devoted patriot and a gallant soldier. Battery Wagner was built under his direction, and his name, with those of others hereafter to be mentioned, who gave their lives in its defense, will be forever commemorated
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
sburg, Reams' Station, Jones' Farm, Hatcher's Run, Fayetteville, Averasboro, Bentonville, Petersburg (April 2, 1865), Amelia Court House, Farmville, and Appomattox. After the war he was engaged in rice planting until 1885, when he accepted the position he still holds of stamp clerk in the Charleston postoffice. Colonel Alexander C. Haskell Colonel Alexander C. Haskell was born in what is now Abbeville county, S. C., September 22, 1839, the fifth child of Charles Thomson and Sophia L. (Cheves) Haskell. In early years he was educated at home under private instructors, and at about the age of fifteen attended school for a time in Charleston. In 1856 he entered the South Carolina college at Columbia, from which institution he was graduated in 1860, with the second honors of his class. In January, 1861, Mr. Haskell enlisted as a private in Company D, First regiment South Carolina volunteer infantry, under command of Col. Maxcy Gregg. The original term of enlistment for the regime