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Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), Correspondence between Mrs. Child, John Brown, and Governor Wise and Mrs. Mason of Virginia. (search)
rpose of nursing your prisoner, and for no other purpose whatsoever. Yours respectfully, L. Maria Child. Reply of Governor Wise. Richmond, Va., October 29, 1859. Madam,--Yours of the 26th wnd Stand not upon the order of your going, But go at once! Yours, with all due respect, L. Maria Child. Explanatory letter to the editor of the New York Tribune: Sir,--I was much surprisedch a mate, has gone to him, and I have received the following reply. Respectfully yours, L. Maria Child. Boston, November 10, 1859. Mrs. Child to John Brown. Wayland [Mass.], October 26, 1859soever may be in store for you! Yours, with heartfelt respect, sympathy and affection, L. Maria Child. Reply of John Brown. Mrs. L. Maria Child: My dear friend,--Such you prove to be, thMrs. L. Maria Child: My dear friend,--Such you prove to be, though a stranger,--your most kind letter has reached me, with the kind offer to come here and take care of me. Allow me to express my gratitude for your great sympathy, and at the same time to propose
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), Reply of Mrs. Child. (search)
the trumpeters. George W. Curtis, the brilliant writer, the eloquent lecturer, the elegant man of the world, lays the wealth of his talent on the altar of Freedom, and makes common cause with rough-shod reformers. The genius of Mrs. Stowe carried the outworks of your institution at one dash, and left the citadel open to besiegers, who are pouring in amain. In the church, on the ultra-liberal side, it is assailed by the powerful battering-ram of Theodore Parker's eloquence. On the extreme orthodox side is set a huge fire, kindled by the burning words of Dr. Cheever. Between them is Henry Ward Beecher, sending a shower of keen arrows into your intrenchments; and with him ride a troop of sharp-shooters from all sects. If you turn to the literature of England or France, you will find your institution treated with as little favor. The fact is, the whole civilized world proclaims slavery an outlaw, and the best intellect of the age is active in hunting it down. L. Maria Child.
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Hon. Lemuel Shaw. (search)
their veins, through generations after generations. If you set aside heart and conscience as appropriate guides for women only, and assume pure cold intellect for a standard of action, what answer will enlightened reason give, if you ask whether free institutions in one part of the country can possibly survive continual compromises with despotism in another part? If the lowest person in the community is legally oppressed, is not the highest endangered thereby? And does not the process inevitably demoralize the people by taking away from law that which renders it sacred, namely, equal and impartial justice? I again ask you, respectfully and earnestly, to read my pamphlets with candid attention. If the request seems to you obtrusive or presumptuous, my apology is that I believe you to be an upright and kind man, and therefore infer that your heart and conscience are not in fault, but only the blinding influences of your social environment. Yours respectfully, L. Maria Child.
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To L. M. Child. (search)
To L. M. Child. They cannot know, who only know Thy wise sweet written word, Whose willing ears thy genial flow Of speech have never heard, Who have not in thy soul's true face Traced each familiar line,-- The spirit's all informing grace That moulds a life like thine. But I, beloved, who have read, As one God's book who reads, The power by purest purpose shed O'er homeliest ways and deeds; Who know thy love's most royal power, With largesse free and brave, Which crowns thee helper of the poor, The suffering and the slave; Yet springs as freely and as warm To greet the near and small, The prosy neighbor at the farm, The squirrel on the wall; Which strengthens thee in hope to bear And toil and strive alone, And lift another's load of care, While wearied 'neath thine own; So apt to know, so wise to guide, So tender to redress,-- O friend, with whom such charms abide, How can I love thee less? E. S.
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Miss Lucy Osgood. (search)
mmon charge against me is that I think too much of beauty, and say too much about it. I myself think it is one of my greatest weaknesses. A handsome man, woman, or child, can always make a fool and a pack-horse of me. My next neighbor's little boy has me completely under his thumb, merely by virtue of his beautiful eyes and sweet voice. I have been a very happy woman since this year came in. My Sunset book Looking towards Sunset. From Sources Old and New, Original and Selected. By L. Maria Child. Boston, 1864. has had most unexpected success. The edition of 4,000 sold before New Year's Day, and they say they might have sold 2,000 more if they had been ready. This pleases me beyond measure, for the proceeds, whether more or less, were vowed to the freedmen; and cheering old folks with one hand, and helping the wronged and suffering with the other, is the highest recreation I ever enjoyed. Nobles or princes cannot discover, or invent, any pleasure equal to earning with one han
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Mrs. S. B. Russell. (search)
To Mrs. S. B. Russell. Wayland, May 24, 1878. Thanks for your affectionate, cheerful letter. I am as pleased as a child with a new (loll, to think you liked my little book Aspirations of the world. A Chain of Opals. Collected, with an Introduction, by L. Maria Child. Boston, 1878. entirely. In this secluded place, where people take little or no interest in anything, I love no means of knowing what effect the book produces. My motive was good, and I tried to write in a candid and kindly spirit. I leave it to its fate, merely hoping that it may do somewhat to enlarge the bands of human brotherhood. Personally I have never expected any advantage from the publication of it. If it pays its own expenses I shall be satisfied. It would mortify me to have the publishers incur debt by it. It is wonderful how shy even liberal ministers generally are about trusting people with the plain truth concerning their religion. They want to veil it in a supernatural haze. They are very
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), chapter 177 (search)
eard, accompanied by the exclamation, he's gone! Then such a thundering stampede as there was down the front stairs I have never heard. We remained in the hall, and presently Samuel J. May came to us so agitated that he was pale to the very lips. Thank God, he is saved! He exclaimed; and we wrung his hand with hearts too full for speech. The Boston newspaper press, as usual, presented a united front in sympathy with the slave-holders. They were full of indignation against the impudent Englishman who dared to suggest to enlightened Americans that there was a contradiction between their slave-laws and the Declaration of Independence. The Boston Post, preeminent in that sort of advocacy of democratic dignity, was very facetious about the cowardly Englishman and his female militia. But they were all in the dark concerning the manner of his escape ; for as the door behind the curtain was known to very few, it remained a mystery to all except the abolitionists. L. Maria Child.
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Mrs. S. S. Russell. (search)
very attentive. It is a great blessing, also, that my general health has been and is extremely good .. Some of my poor neighbors have been in trouble owing to protracted illness, and I shall make up to them the days when they have not been able to work. The worthy young man who comes here to sleep needs some help about learning a trade, and I am going to give him a lift. Divers other projects I have in my mind, and I expect to accomplish them all by the help of Aladdin's lamp. Oh, it is such a luxury to be able to give without being afraid. I try not to be Quixotic, but I want to rain down blessings on all the world, in token of thankfulness for the blessings that have been rained down upon me. I should dearly love to look in upon you at Newport, as you kindly suggest, but it is impossible. I once made a short visit to Dr. Channing there, and the loveliness of the scenery made an abiding impression on my memory. Your most grateful and loving old friend, L. Maria Child.
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), Appendix. (search)
Appendix. Remarks of Wendell Phillips at the funeral of Lydia Maria Child, October 23, 1880. Mrs. Child's character was one of rare Mrs. Child's character was one of rare elements, and their combination in one person rarer still. She was the outgrowth of New England theology, traditions, and habits -the finest she bore it almost till life's close! In religious speculation Mrs. Child moved in the very van. Her studies and friendships were with the rrowness among free religionists than among their opponents. But Mrs. Child in her many-sidedness did not merely bear with other creeds; she n it saps independence and shuts up the over-careful hand. But Mrs. Child's prudence never held back one needed bold word, and was only to more than she could do to wisely distribute her income, and that Mrs. Child could and should help her in that, it was like her also to change on a whole sheet when half a one would suffice. I do not think, Mrs. Child, you can afford to give so much just now, I said to her once, whe
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), List of Mrs. Child's works, with the date of their first publication as far as ascertained. (search)
List of Mrs. Child's works, with the date of their first publication as far as ascertained. Hobomok: a Tale of Early Times. Boston, 1824. 12°. Evenings in New England. Intended for Juvenileicans called Africans. Boston, 1833. 12vo. The Oasis. Boston, 1834. 16vo. contents.-- Child, Mrs. L. M. Brief Memoir of Wilberforce; How to effect Emancipation; Malem Boo; Illustration of Opinions of Travellers; Jamaica Mobs. Follen, Mrs., Remember the slave; The runaway slave. Child, D. L. Henry Diaz; Three Colored Republics of Guiana; Judicial Decisions in Slave States. Whiaves: Tales and Sketches in Prose and Rhyme. New York, 1856. 16vo. Correspondence between L. M. Child and Gov. Wise and Mrs. Mason (of Virginia). Boston, 1860. 12vo. The Duty of Disobedience tal and Selected. Boston, 1868. 8vo. An Appeal for the Indians. New York (1868?). 12vo. Aspirations of the World. A Chain of Opals. With an Introduction by L. M. Child. Boston, 1878. 16vo.
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