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Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 155 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 26 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 20 4 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 19 3 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 18 0 Browse Search
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist 17 1 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 16 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. 16 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 15 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 14 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 25.. You can also browse the collection for Lydia Maria Child or search for Lydia Maria Child in all documents.

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provision dealer, living in the rear). I think, from hearsay, his most prosperous days in business were spent there. At that time he had numerous apprentices, several of whom married townspeople and became honored wives and mothers. Finally he was able to retain only his oldest patrons, who cared little for advanced methods, and styles in tailoring, and his trade was transferred to Mr. Hervey and others. . . . There was a tinge of romance about his marriage. A foster-sister of Mrs. Lydia Maria Child, who lived in the house corner of Ashland and Salem streets, applied to him to be taught the trade. He told her he did not care for more apprentices, but if she would promise, when through, not to set up business in Medford, he would take her. In a year they were married, he being twenty-eight years old and his wife eighteen. She was a direct descendant of Peter Tufts. . . . I will say in passing that in the Salem street burying ground, a rod or two from the monument in a southeast