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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for R. H. Chilton or search for R. H. Chilton in all documents.

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d throughout by the General and the officers and the men under his command. In addition to the officers honorably mentioned in the report of the expedition, the conduct of the following privates has received the special commendation of their respective commanders: Private Thomas D. Clapp, Co. D, First Virginia cavalry, and J. S. Mosby, serving in the same regiment; privates Ashton, Brent, R. Herring, F. Herring, and F. Coleman, Co. E, Ninth Virginia cavalry. By command of General Lee, R. H. Chilton, A. A. G. Richmond Dispatch account. It being determined upon to penetrate the enemy's lines, and make a full and thorough reconnoissance of their position and strength, Gen. J. E. B. Stuart ordered the First, (Col. Fitz-Hugh Lee,) Ninth, (Col. F. H. Fitz-Hugh Lee,) and Fourth Virginia cavalry, (Lieut. Gardiner commanding,) to hold themselves in readiness. these regiments however, did not turn out more than half their usual strength, the Fourth not having more than four companies
at the head of his command, which was the advance of the left wing of the army. We have collected about one thousand five hundred small arms, and other ordnance stores. I am, Colonel, your obedient servant. T. J. Jackson, Major-General. Col. R. H. Chilton, A. A.G. Richmond Enquirer account. An intelligent correspondent sends us the following, dated on the battle-field, Sunday morning, August tenth, three A. M.: Gen. Jackson has fought the Yankees, and has again whipped them. We leere is a large amount of camp and garrison equipage. Our loss was very small. The meritorious conduct of officers and men will be mentioned in a more extended report. I am, Colonel, your obedient servant, T. J. Jackson, Major-General. Col. R. H. Chilton, Assistant Adjutant General. Richmond Dispatch account. From a participant in the engagement, we have obtained some particulars with reference to the investment and subsequent surrender of Harper's Ferry. Our informant states that G
ed prisoners, including Brig.-Gen. Prince. While our list of killed is less than that of the enemy, yet we have to mourn the loss of some of our best officers and men. Brig.-Gen. Charles S. Winder was mortally wounded while ably discharging his duty at the head of his command, which was the advance of the left wing of the army. We have collected about one thousand five hundred small arms, and other ordnance stores. I am, Colonel, your obedient servant. T. J. Jackson, Major-General. Col. R. H. Chilton, A. A.G. Richmond Enquirer account. An intelligent correspondent sends us the following, dated on the battle-field, Sunday morning, August tenth, three A. M.: Gen. Jackson has fought the Yankees, and has again whipped them. We left from above Gordonsville on Friday, about half-past 3 o'clock A. M., on an advance movement. About the middle of the day our cavalry came in contact with the Yankee cavalry, and after a sharp engagement they took to their heels, losing about twent
ms with another brilliant success on the surrender, at Harper's Ferry, of Brig.-General White and eleven thousand troops, an equal number of small arms, seventy-three pieces of artillery, and about two hundred wagons. In addition to other stores, there is a large amount of camp and garrison equipage. Our loss was very small. The meritorious conduct of officers and men will be mentioned in a more extended report. I am, Colonel, your obedient servant, T. J. Jackson, Major-General. Col. R. H. Chilton, Assistant Adjutant General. Richmond Dispatch account. From a participant in the engagement, we have obtained some particulars with reference to the investment and subsequent surrender of Harper's Ferry. Our informant states that Gen. Jackson left Frederick on Thursday, taking the Hagerstown road, and at the same time the division of Generals McLaws and R. H. Anderson, moved from the vicinity of Frederick for the Maryland Heights, overlooking the town of Harper's Ferry. On We