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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General J. E. B. Stuart's report of his cavalry expedition into Pennsylvania in October, 1862. (search)
al J. E. B. Stuart's report of his cavalry expedition into Pennsylvania in October, 1862. [The following report, which we print from an original Ms. in General Stuart's own handwriting, does not appear in the Army of Northern Virginia reports, published by the Confederate Congress, and has, we believe, never been in print. Like everything from the great cavalry chieftain, it will attract attention and be read with interest.] headquarters cavalry division, October 14th, 1862. Colonel R. H. Chilton, A. A. General Army of Northern Virginia: Colonel — I have the honor to report that on the 9th instant, in compliance with instructions from the Commanding General Army of Northern Virginia, I proceeded on an expedition into Pennsylvania with a cavalry force of 1,800 and four pieces of horse artillery, under command of Brigadier-General Hampton and Colonels W. H. F. Lee and Jones. This force rendezvoused at Darksville at 12 M., and marched thence to the vicinity of Hedgesville, w
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Cavalry operations in May, 1863--report of General J. E. B. Stuart. (search)
south of James river recruiting. That Stoneman with a large cavalry force was allowed to penetrate into the heart of the State, though comparatively harmless in results, is due to the entire inadequacy in numbers of the cavalry of the Army of Northern Virginia. The enemy has confronted us with at least three divisions of cavalry, more or less concentrated, which we opposed with one division, spread from the Chesapeake to the Alleghany, yet had not the approach of a battle below made it necessary to divide the force of the two Lee's, I feel very confident it would have been prevented, though with great sacrifice of life, owing to disparity of numbers. With the Commanding General, who is aware of all the facts, we are content to rest our vindication, if the pursuit of the plain path of duty needs vindication. Most respectfully, your obedient servant, (Signed) J. E. B. Stuart, Major-General. Brigadier-General R. H. Chilton, A. A. and I. General, Army of Northern Virginia.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Chancellorsville--report of General R. E. Lee. (search)
on and all evinced the greatest energy and zeal. The Medical Director of the army, Surgeon Guild, with the officers of his department, were untiring in their attention to the wounded. Lieutenant-Colonel Corley, Chief Quartermaster, took charge of the disposition and safety of the trains of the army. Lieutenant-Colonel Cole, Chief Commissary of its subsistence, and Lieutenant-Colonel Baldwin, Chief of Ordnance, were everywhere on the field attending to the wants of their departments. General Chilton, Chief of Staff, Lieutenant-Colonel Murray, Major Peyton and Captain Young, of the Adjutant and Inspector-General's Department, were active in seeing to the execution of orders. Lieutenant-Colonel Smith and Captain Johnston, of the engineers, in reconnoitering the enemy and constructing batteries; Colonel Long, in posting troops and artillery; Majors Taylor, Talcott, Marshall and Venable, were engaged night and day in watching the operations, carrying orders, &c. Respectfully submit
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of seven Pines-report of General James Longstreet. (search)
my young aid, Lieutenant R. W. Blackwell--have my kind thanks for their activity, zeal and intelligence in carrying orders and the proper discharge of their duties. Captain Walton was slightly wounded. I am indebted to General Wigfall and Colonel P. T. Moore, volunteer aids, for assistance in rallying troops and carrying orders during the battle of the 31st instant, and kindly aided in carrying orders during the several assaults made by the enemy on that day. I am also indebted to Colonel R. H. Chilton for material aid. Dr. J. S. D. Cullen, Surgeon-in-Chief, and the officers of his Department, kindly and untiringly devoted themselves to the wounded, They have none of the chances of distinction of other officers, but discharge the most important duties. I refer to his report for the conduct of the officers of his department. Detailed reports of the major-generals, brigadiers and other commanders and chiefs of staff have been called for, and will be forwarded as soon as received.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of General J. E. B. Stuart of cavalry operations on First Maryland campaign, from August 30th to September 18th, 1862. (search)
y, was particularly distinguished on the field of Sharpsburg for his coolness, and his valuable services as acting aid-de-camp. I deem it proper to mention here also a young lad named Randolph, of Fauquier, who, apparently about 12 years of age, brought me several messages from General Jackson under circumstances of great personal peril, and delivered his dispatches with a clearness and intelligence highly creditable to him. Private--------, Cobb's Georgia legion, one of my couriers, was killed while behaving with the most conspicuous bravery, having borrowed a horse to ride to the field. He had been sent to post a battery of artillery from his native State. Captain Frayser, signal corps, rendered important services to the Commanding General from a mountain overlooking the enemy on the Antietam. I have the honor to be, Very respectfully, your obedient servant, (Signed) J. E. B. Stuart, Major-General. Colonel R. H. Chilton, Chief of Staff, Army of Northern Virginia.