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Browsing named entities in Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative. You can also browse the collection for R. H. Chilton or search for R. H. Chilton in all documents.

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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, chapter 7 (search)
cers. Jackson's first failure. Jackson's march. Stuart and Trimble. Branch moves. A. P. Hill moves. battle of Mechanicsville. Porter's retreat. A. P. Hill's advance. Gaines Mill position. the chances. Jackson at Cold Harbor. Porter's account. Hill's account. Lee's account. Jackson ordered in. general advance. enemy's escape. casualties. remarks. When Gen. Lee, on June 1, 1862, took command of the Army of Northern Virginia, he brought with him his personal staff, — Col. R. H. Chilton, Adjutant, Col. A. L. Long, Military Secretary, and Majs. Taylor, Venable, Marshall, and Talcotts, as Aides. He retained the chiefs of all departments, — Corley as Quartermaster, Cole as Commissary, Guild as Medical Director, and myself as Ordnance Officer, — and all matters of routine went on as before. The chances of a successful campaign against McClellan had increased greatly when Johnston fell, wounded, as has been already told. Johnston had proposed the concentration at Ric<
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, chapter 8 (search)
mentum would have insured him success. His failure to do so is the best evidence that our wise commander fully understood the character of his opponent. Our relief was therefore great when intelligence reached us almost simultaneously from Col. Chilton and one of my staff, that the enemy, whose presence had been ascertained as late as 3.30 A. M., had evacuated his works and was retreating. Col. Chilton, who rode into my camp on Sunday morning, hurried me off to see Gen. Lee on the Nine MiCol. Chilton, who rode into my camp on Sunday morning, hurried me off to see Gen. Lee on the Nine Mile road, and I gave, while riding with him, the necessary orders to put in motion my whole command, which extended over a distance of some miles, directing Gen. Griffith's brigade, which was nearest to the road, to advance at once from the centre, and ordering Gen. Jones's division, in advancing, to incline toward Fair Oaks Station, as I had been informed that Maj.-Gen. Jackson had crossed, or was crossing, the Grapevine bridge, and would operate down the Chickahominy. Having overtaken Gen. Lee
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, chapter 9 (search)
burst prematurely over their own lines, when their fire was ordered to cease. The order to charge the enemy's lines was, however, not made absolute. Magruder, Huger, and D. H. Hill, with their 14 brigades, were notified as follows about noon: — July 1, 1862. Batteries have been established to rake the enemy's line. If it is broken, as is probable, Armistead, who can witness the effect of the fire, has been ordered to charge with a yell. Do the same. By order of Gen. Lee. R. H. Chilton, A. A. G. The charge, therefore, was made to depend upon our being able to inaugurate and conduct with success an artillery duel of some magnitude. Pioneers were sent to open a road to the left, and it was expected that artillery would act upon both flanks; but here our organization broke down. Gen. Pendleton, Lee's Chief of Artillery, had a large artillery reserve, organized in four battalions of several batteries each, including our best rifled guns; but he was not able to bri