Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for R. H. Chilton or search for R. H. Chilton in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Kelleysville, March 17th, 1863-Reports of Generals J. E. B. Stuart and Fitz. Lee. (search)
be accessible to but few. We are confident, therefore, that many of our readers will be glad to have us print them from the original Mss. in our possession.] Headquarters cavalry division, Army of Northern Virginia, March 25, 1863. General R. H. Chilton, A. A. G.: General: I have the honor to enclose herewith the very graphic report of Brig.-Gen. Fitzhugh Lee of the battle of Kelleysville, (March 17th), between his brigade and a division of the enemy's cavalry. There is little to be chievements of the war, Gen. Lee's command in action being less than 800. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, J. E. B. Stuart, Maj.-Gen. Commanding. Headquarters Lee's cavalry brigade, March 23d, 1863. General R. H. Chilton, A. A. & I. Gen'l A. N. Va. Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of an encounter on the 17th instant between my brigade and a division of the enemy's cavalry, certainly not less than 3,000 mounted men with a battery of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Chancellorsville-report of Major-General Stuart. (search)
Battle of Chancellorsville-report of Major-General Stuart. Headquarters Second corps, Army of Northern Virginia, May 6th, 1863. Brig. Gen. R. H. Chilton, A. A. & I. G., Headquarters A. N. V.: General: I have the honor to submit, in advance of a detailed report, the following narrative of events connected with the battle of the Wilderness, May second, and of Chancellorsville, May third, and events following: This corps, under its immortal leader, Lieut.-Gen. Jackson, attacked the enemy on his right, turning his right flank by the turnpike road, at Melzie Chancellor's, two miles above Chancellorsville, making the attack late in the evening, after an arduous and necessarily circuitous march from the plank road, two miles below Chancellorsville. The enemy had a fine position, and if time had been given him to recover from his first surprise and mass troops on that front, it would have been a difficult task to dislodge them; but Jackson's entire corps, both when marching and