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Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley) 82 4 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 62 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 44 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 25 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 16 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 14 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 14 2 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 13 3 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 12 0 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 8 0 Browse Search
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ere not allowed to see, as it is thought to contain important evidence for Government. An account-book was also found, containing in the back part a list of vessels, probably captured by the rebels, as follows: Jacob Bell, Star of Peace, Oneida, Commonwealth, Kate Dyer, Lapwing, Colcord, Henrietta, Clarence, Estelle, Windward, Carrie Ann, Aldebaran, Byzantium, Isaac Webb, Shatemuc, Whistling Wind, Tacony, Goodspeed, Mary Alvina, Arabella, Umpire, Maringo, Florence, Ripple, Elizabeth Ann, Rufus Choate, Ada, Alfred Partridge, M. A. Shindler, Kate Stuart, Archer, a sloop, Wanderer. The following is a list of chronometers found on board schooner Archer: Bark Tacony, going; bark Whistling Wind, run down; brig Umpire, going; brig Clarence, going; ship Byzantium, going; bark Goodspeed, going. It appears from the memorandum-book that Lieutenant Read and crew went on board the Tacony about the fourteenth of May. On the twenty-fifth of June he seems to have burned the Tacony and gone on
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), The Reveries of Reverdy. (search)
mbecility. A pretty prospect, indeed! Mr. Johnson concludes with total ruin , and thus finishes the most melancholy epistle which we have read for many a day. We will do him the justice to say that in the water-cart style he is easily first. Choate is lurid, but Johnson is moist. The only encouraging thing which he says is, that the Kansas excitement is permanently closed; and he exults thereat. If he really thought so, he might have made his letter somewhat shorter and a trifle gayer. W fashion of lugubriosity had gone out, and that our public men of the Democratic party were about to show a little valor, and affect a confidence in the stability of the Union, even if they possessed it not. But they get worse and worse. The Hon. Rufus Choate, as we understand, now wears a hair shirt, fasts for seven days together, and spends all his leisure hours in offering prayers for the preservation of the Union. The Hon. Edward Everett has been a stranger to happiness for several years,
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), Mr. Choate on Dr. Adams's Sermons. (search)
Mr. Choate on Dr. Adams's Sermons. the Essex Street Church, in the city of Boston, enjoys the p Dr. Adams was held last Monday evening, and Mr. Choate made a beautiful speech upon the occasion, ihad never hurt the feelings of the Honorable Mr. Choate, who said: Never in an introductory p From this it will be seen how exceedingly Mr. Choate has enjoyed his religion, and how much the ccash and other valuable articles. In truth, Mr. Choate argues the matter with great profundity. Helitics he cannot understand. He will ) said Mr. Choate, have learned from his Bible that the race oneralities are modified by civil society. Mr. Choate is clearly advancing. Some years ago he dis join the church of the Rev. Dr. Adams--then Mr. Choate is right and his pastor is right. But this nt; but we cannot, of course, keep pace with Mr. Choate. For it seems to us, that if politics have By the discussion of these, we should be very sorry to have Mr. Choate disturbed. April 2, 1859. [2 more...]
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), University Wanted. (search)
it is the prescribed privilege of Freshman and of Sophomore to pull the presidential nose, or to assault an offending tutor. It is a college in which every Freshman may be called to recitation by his private and personal Sambo, and may even employ a learned nigger, if he can find one, to coach him through Euripides and Cicero. This is the college which is to knock into a sort of classical and mathematical Carthage, dear old Harvard and always respectable Yale, Dartmouth, which produced Rufus Choate, and all other Northern seminaries whatever. No wonder The Louisiana Democrat looks forward to such a foundation with pleasant emotions, and anticipates a new impetus to the science, learning and literature of a great country. A Southern University! What a pleasing notion! How suggestive of exegesis, cumulative and conclusive, concerning Joseph, Abraham and Moses, Paul and Onesimus, illustrating the true significance of doulos, and historically, critically and classically proving, t
go, certainly affords no authority for slandering the living. If the late Mr. Rufus Choate, while he succeeded as nisi prius lawyer, failed as a statesman, we do not best of his not inconsiderable ability, those who have been more fortunate. Mr. Choate may have had little fondness for political life, and no aptitude whatever forneer at the distinguished active statesmen of the day. Nor did the memory of Mr. Choate require any such apology. A lawyer in great practice, exceedingly devoted tochstone of political character at the present time, and the test was fatal to Mr. Choate. He thought to be enslaved was the best for the blacks, and that to enslave t questions — in timidly avoiding the conflict when danger was at its height, Mr. Choate did nothing worthy of imitation or eulogy. We are not permitted to avoid tbut the responsibility of any pain which we may give to any honest admirer of Mr. Choate, must be borne by his Faneuil Hall Eulogist. It is better that we and those
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), A Biographical battle. (search)
been his remains if he had not arisen. But Mr. Choate undoubtedly expected to have his life taken their initial chapters. The Reminiscences of Choate, put out by Colonel Edward G. Parker, have, am out of the harassing uncertainties of which Mr. Choate, when alive, made a snug sum enough in the ceroical, of which the central figure will be Mr. Choate, more like Jupiter Ammon than a member of th is right. Pray what does the world want of Mr. Choate in his shirt-sleeves? Of Mr. Choate laughinMr. Choate laughing, chatting, cracking jokes? of Mr. Choate careless of money, of appearances, and of his chirographMr. Choate careless of money, of appearances, and of his chirography? of Mr. Choate in his character of human being, fond of the same food and drink which nourish and cheer ordinary creatures? The real Family Choate will be of incomputable altitude, with a voice li. J. The classical learning of the real Family Choate will rival that of Porson and Dacier, of Bentl and good For human nature's daily food. Mr. Choate's biography may not be worth writing at all,[7 more...]
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), Mr. Bancroft on the Declaration of Independence. (search)
Mr. Bancroft on the Declaration of Independence. Mr. Rufus Choate, deceased, has left upon record his opinion, that the ethics of the Declaration of Independence are merely glittering generalities. Mr. Caleb Cushing, muzzy and mazy as he is, in thought and expression, has contrived to assert, with tolerable clearness, that in his opinion all men are not born free and equal. Mr. Charles O'Connor is of the same mind. So in his day was Mr. John C. Calhoun. Of course there is nothing to be useless to palterers. We did not need it, but we are happy to have the opinion of Mr. George Bancroft, the best known of our historians, that the Declaration was not a tissue of glittering generalities. Mr. Bancroft contradicts the late Mr. Rufus Choate point blank, and in words which are curiously responsive to those of that advocate; for Mr. Bancroft says distinctly that the Declaration avoided specious and vague generalities. Again, those who have been misled by the indignant or contemp
Bodin on Slavery303 Butler, General317, 318, 320, 322 Burke, Edmund, an Emancipationist328 Bachelder, Dr., a Funny Physician312 Buxton, Fowell384 Choate, Rufus45, 58, 84 Choate, Rufus Scrambles of his Biographers102 Cumberland Presbyterian Church68 Cumberland Presbyterian Newspaper79 Columbia (S. C.), Choate, Rufus Scrambles of his Biographers102 Cumberland Presbyterian Church68 Cumberland Presbyterian Newspaper79 Columbia (S. C.), Bell-Ringing in125 Commons, House of, on Gregory's Motion168 Colleges, Southern172 Cotton, Moral Influence of201 Congress, The Confederate222, 238 Clergymen, Second--Hand224 Carlyle, Thomas323 Davis, Jefferson42, 274, 279, 282, 283, 288, 380, 388, 346 Diarist, A Southern124 Dargan, Chancellor160 DahomEducation56 Pierce, Franklin29 Pollard, Mr., his Mammy 63 Palfrey, General, in Boston73 Perham, Josiah, his Invitation97 Parker, E. G., his Life of Choate108 Patents Granted in the South134 Polk, Bishop172 Parties, Extemporizing242 Platform Novelties in Boston247 Paley, Dr., on Slavery808 Pitt, Wil
sion graduates, weighing ninety-seven pounds voyage in a fishing vessel study of law method pursued experience as teacher in private school examination for admission to the bar The political system of this country is founded upon what Rufus Choate once termed a glittering generality, contained in the Declaration of Independence, that all men are created equal. This is a truth as applied to political rights, immunities, and burdens, but an utter absurdity so far as it is made to describrtance, and I had such cause to reverence and admire him that in my library, where I now write, stand three busts of the three greatest lawyers, each in his peculiar sphere, of whom I ever had any knowledge: Jeremiah Mason, Daniel Webster, and Rufus Choate. The consummate ability and skill shown by him in perhaps one of his most important trials,--the case of Ware vs. Ware, which I have mentioned,--has nearly tempted me into a description of the trial. But I am warned that I cannot do Mr. Ma
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 12: administration of finances, politics, and justice.--recall. (search)
the officer ordered to catch the thief, and who did catch him and convict him, was punished to a very much greater extent than the thief himself. Again, and this I say with great pride and pleasure, I attended during my stay in New Orleans to the administration of justice, and decided all sorts of questions, civil and criminal. As of course I could not have time to do that without assistance, I appointed Maj. Joseph Bell, of Massachusetts, A. D. C., a son-in-law and partner. of the Hon. Rufus Choate, of Boston, to be my provost judge The title, Provost Judge, describes an officer of a general's staff appointed by him to investigate and decide all complaints and other matters which the general would be called upon to investigate He gets his title from the old Norman French provostre, for yourself, i. e., instead of the general. to aid me in these judicial duties. Very able, fair-minded, clear-headed and of great legal knowledge was he, and of so great merit that when I was re
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