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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 10 0 Browse Search
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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 3: Newport 1879-1882; aet. 60-63 (search)
Music formed a large part of the summer's pleasure. The Journal tells of a visit from Timothee Adamowski which was greatly enjoyed. October 11. Much delightful music. Adamowski has made a pleasant impression upon all of us. October 12, Sunday. Sorry to say we made music all day. Looked hard for Uncle Sam, who came not. October 13. Our delightful matinee. Adamowski and Daisy played finely, he making a great sensation. I had the pleasure of accompanying Adamowski in a Nocturne of Chopin's for violin and piano. All went well. Our pleasure and fatigue were both great. The house looked charming. In the autumn came a lecture tour, designed to recoup the heavy expenses of the Eastern trip. Never skilful in matters of money-making, this tour was undertaken with less preparation than the modern lecturer could well imagine. She corresponded with I Luther Terry, an American painter who had lived long in Rome, and had been a close friend of Thomas Crawford. He survived hi
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 7: a summer abroad 1892-1893; aet. 73-74 (search)
Some talk with Lady H. about Mrs. Fawcett, et al.: also concerning Mrs. Martin's intended candidacy for the presidency of the United States, which, however futile in itself, we deplore as tending to throw ridicule upon the Woman's Cause. She thought that the Conservatives would give women the Parliamentary Suffrage in England on account of the great number of women who have joined the Primrose League. July 10. To the Temple Church. The organ voluntaries, strangely, I thought, were first Chopin's Funeral March, second the Dead March in Saul. A notable sermon from Dr. Vaughan. The discourse was really concerned with the political situation of the moment: the strong division of feeling throughout the country, and the fears of many lest the doctrine in which they believe should be overthrown. He said that the real Ark of God was the Church Universal, which has been defined as the whole company of believing Christian people throughout the world. Many changes would occur, but the v
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 14: the sundown splendid and serene 1906-1907; aet. 87-88 (search)
, with fingers still deft and nimble. She loved the older operas best. After an air from Don Giovanni, she would say, Mozart must be in heaven: they could never get on without him! She thought Handel's Messiah the most divine point reached by earthly music. Beethoven awed and swayed her deeply, and she often quoted his utterance while composing, Ich trat in der Ndhe Gottes! She thrilled with tender pleasure over Verdi's Non ti scordar, or Ai nostri monti, and over Martha. She enjoyed Chopin almost too much. He is exquisite, she would say, but somehow — rotten! Among the pleasures of this winter was a visit to, New York. She writes after it:-- My last day in my dear son's house. He and Fannie have been devotedly kind to me. They made me occupy their room, much to my bodily comfort, but to the great disquiet of my mind, as I hated much to inconvenience them. My son has now a very eminent position.... God bless the house and all in it. December 17. The Old South Chap
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 15: mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord 1908-1910; aet. 89-91 (search)
and publishing of her Occasional poems. In late September, she was moved to write one or more open letters on what religion really is, for some one of the women's papers ; and the next day began upon What is religion? or rather, What Sort of Religion makes Religious Liberty possible? A day or two later, she was giving an offhand talk on the early recollections of Newport at the Papeterie, and going to an afternoon tea at a musical house, where, after listening to Schumann Romances and Chopin waltzes, and to the Battle Hymn on the 'cello, she was moved to give a performance of Flibbertigibbet. This occasion reminded her happily of her father's house, of Henry playing tolerably on the 'cello, Marion studying the violin, Broa Sam's lovely tenor voice. Now came the early October days when she was to receive the degree of Doctor of Laws from Smith College. She hesitated about making the tiresome journey, but finally, Grudging the trouble and expense, I decide to go to Smith Coll
ial Church, II, 78. Chapman, Elizabeth, II, 215, 224, 289. Chapman, J. J., II, 361. Charitable Eye and Ear Infirmary, I, 129. Charity Club, II, 228. Charleston, I, 11. Chase, Jacob, II, 57, 58. Chase, Mrs., Jacob, II, 57. Chatelet, Mme. du, II, 23. Chaucer, Geoffrey, II, 271. Cheney, E. D., I, 341, 375; II, 88, 119, 152, 195, 208, 266, 302, 324, 328. Chester, II, 4, 164. Chicago, I, 374; II, 87, 131, 138, 178, 180, 184. Chickering, Mr., I, 120. Chopin, Frederic, II, 55, 170, 351. Christian Herald, II, 278. Christian Register, II, 62. Church of Rome, II, 241. Church of the Disciples, I, 186, 237, 284, 346, 392; II, 56. Cincinnati, I, 169. City Point, II, 75. Clarke, Bishop, II, 198. Clarke, J. F., I, 177, 185, 186, 187, 198, 211, 219, 236, 239, 247, 257, 263, 286, 290, 346, 362, 375, 392; II, 66, 67, 70, 76, 137, 159, 234, 280, 402, 403. Clarke, Mrs. J. F., II, 217. Clarke, Sarah, I, 237. Claudius, Matthias, I,