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J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 528 2 Browse Search
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians 261 11 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 199 3 Browse Search
William W. Bennett, A narrative of the great revival which prevailed in the Southern armies during the late Civil War 192 2 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 131 1 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 122 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 106 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 103 3 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 78 0 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 77 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register. You can also browse the collection for Jesus Christ or search for Jesus Christ in all documents.

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notice of my enemies, where we enjoyed sweet fellowship one with another and also with God, in a house which was fit to entertain any prince for fairness, greatness, and pleasantness. Here the Lord hid us all the winter long, and when it was fit to travel in the spring, we went up to London, Mr. Harlakenden not forsaking me all this while, for he was a father and mother to me, etc. (Boston Ed., 1832, pp. 54, 55). Mr. Shepard was accompanied to New England by this most precious servant of Jesus Christ, and bitterly lamented his early death; This loss was partially repaired by the accession of Herbert Pelham, Esq., in 1638 or 1639. He married the widow of Mr. Harlakenden, and was successively Treasurer of Harvard College, 1643, Assistant, 1645-49, and Commissioner of the United Colonies, 1645-46. He brought with him his daughter Penelope, who afterwards became the wife of Governor Josiah Winslow, and died at Marshfield, 7 Dec., 1703, aged 72. Mr. Pelham was an active citizen and offic
choyce, I would rather abide wth ys saint in his poor cottage then wth any one of ye princes yt I know of at ys day in ye world. 24d. 6 m.—Wee visited G. Goodman. Beale, sorely afflicted with ye stone. He complained yt he could not in ye extremity of ye pain submitt with cheerfullness to ye will of God; & told us yt God spake many things to him under this exercise. 26d. 6 m.—Mr. Mitchell wth diverse came to visit us; or discourse tended to provoke to give up or selves wholly to Jesus Christ and make him ye whole delight of or souls. Within a few days after Whalley and Goffe left Cambridge, orders arrived from England for their arrest; and there was at least a show of earnest exertion, on the part of the magistrates, to overtake them; but the effort was in vain. Knowing that dissatisfaction existed in the English government, not only on account of their friendly reception of the regicides, but also for their persistent disregard of the navigation laws, and many other act
Edward Rawson, Secretary. Mass. Col. Rec., v. 515, 516. Dudley was superseded in the government by Sir Edmund Andros, who landed at Boston Dec. 20, 1686, and his commission was published the same day. Hutchinson's Hist. Mass., i. 353. During his administration, the people were in a condition little better than slavery. In the Massachusetts Archives Mass. Arch., CXXVIII. 142, 143. is a statement by Thomas Danforth, that, Our rulers are those that hate us and the churches of Christ and his servants in the ministry; they are their daily scorn, taunt, and reproach; and yet are we, our lives, and liberties, civil and ecclesiastical, in their hands, to do with us as they please; some of the chief of them have said,—no better than slaves, only they had not power to sell us for slaves. We are deprived of privileges of Englishmen, of the benefit of the great Charter of our nation; our lands and possessions seized and granted to strangers, contrary to the Stat. Car. I. Cap.
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register, Chapter 15: ecclesiastical History. (search)
he temple of the Lord, and that he was without Christ. But he went from thence to another place, unollowed examples and duties, and made them his Christ, and lived without Christ. Hereby the Lord leChrist. Hereby the Lord let him see he was Christless, and built upon false foundations, and by this text he saw himself no ne did humble him under this, he saw the want of Christ, and that without him he must perish. And aft so was stirred up with more vehemency to seek Christ. And then that promise was opened, the Son ofe second day of the tenth month in the year of Christ 1638. l.s.d. Imprimis was contributed the the 30th 1654, to the dishonor of the name of Christ, his truth, and minister. Probably Mr. Mitco forbear and not to interrupt an ordinance of Christ, yet notwithstanding he proceeded in way of cos, he asserted as his testimony in the name of Christ these things: 1. That the subjects of baptismbecoming extensively useful to the churches of Christ in this Commonwealth. . . . . In his last illn[14 more...]
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register, Chapter 16: ecclesiastical History. (search)
nd ordained Jan. 19, 1814. During his pastorate occurred that theological contest which rent the parish and church of Dr. Holmes asunder. The great majority of the Cambridgeport Parish, together with their pastor, adhered to what was styled the liberal party, and were thenceforth known as Unitarians. Mr. Gannett, however, did not take an active part in the contest, but devoted himself entirely to the inculcation of those moral duties and Christian graces which become the true disciples of Christ. Indeed, he is reported to have expressed the highest satisfaction, in his mature years, that he had never preached a doctrinal sermon. Early in 1833 he closed his labors with a flock which had abundant cause to regard him with profound respect and love. A good man, —one like Nathaniel of old, without guile,—according to the gift that was in him, had gone in and out before the people, pure and godly in his conversation, charitable in his words and feelings as in his deeds, keeping peace w
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register, Chapter 17: heresy and witchcraft. (search)
der, in your Governor's house at Boston, and said to him, Wenlock, I am a mortal man, and die I must, and that ere long, and I must appear at the tribunal-seat of Christ, and must give an account for my deeds in the body; and I believe it will be my greatest glory in that day, that I have given my vote for thee to be soundly whipp 260-264. At the County Court, October 6, 1663, Benanuel Bowers appearing before the court, and being convicted of absenting himself from the public ordinances of Christ on the Lord's days, by his own confession, for about a quarter of a year past, and of entertaining Quakers into his family two several times; on his examination hll you, that I did attend God's worship according to my faith and conscience, and according to Scripture which saith, where two or three are assembled together in Christ's name he is in the midst of them. And this I can prove by those that assaulted us (on the first day of the week) when we were met to worship God. At that very
Constable Black James; giving each of them a charge to be diligent and faithful in their places. Also I exhorted the people to yeild obedience to the gospel of Christ, and to those set in order there. Then published a warran t or order that I had prepared, empowering the constable to suppress drunkenness, sabbath-breaking, esp II. 449, 450. This cruel frame of spirits (for I can give it no gentler denomination) arose, I apprehend, from a double ground; first the malice of Satan against Christ's work among the Indians, and to hinder their progress in religion. ..... A second root of this trouble arose from the perfidious and unfaithful dealing of the wiand encouraged, and instructed, and prayed with them and for them; exhorting them to patience in their sufferings, and confirming the hearts of those disciples of Christ, and exhorting them to continue in the faith, for through many tribulations we must enter into the kingdom of heaven..... In the night, about midnight, the tide s
instructions to Captain Joseph Sill, He was a Cambridge man, and was styled Lieutenant before September 24, 1675, when he was appointed Captain of one hundred men, under Major John Pynchon. Nov. 2, 1675, to take charge of the soldiers raised from Charlestown, Watertown, and Cambridge, which are about sixty men, and to go forth against the enemy, closing thus: so desiring the ever-living Lord God to accompany you and your company with his gracious conduct and presence, and that he will for Christ's sake appear in all the mounts of difficulty, and cover all your heads in the day of battle, and deliver the bloodthirsty and cruel enemy of God and his people into your hands, and make you executioners of his just indignation upon them, and return you victorious unto us, I commit you and your company unto God, and remain your very loving friend, Daniel Gookin, Senr. Mass. Arch., Ixviii. 40. This signature was afterwards erased, and By the Council, E. R. S. substituted. The names of so
he befriended, prevented his election. He was elected Captain of the Cambridge band, or military company, before 1652, and was described by Johnson as a Kentish soldier, a very forward man to advance martial discipline, and. withal the truths of Christ. He became Major of the Middlesex Regiment in 1676, and was very active in raising and furnishing troops in Philip's War. In 1681 he was appointed Major-general of all the military force of the Colony, and was the last who held that office underrnal, says, he was a very godly man, and of good use both in the commonwealth and in the church. He was buried with military honor, because he was Lieutenant-colonel. Shepard describes him as my most dear friend, and most precious servant of Jesus Christ. His daughters, if they survived so long, probably went to England with their step-father in 1648; and it is not known that any of his descendants have since resided in this country. Mabel, sister of Roger (1), m. Governor John Haynes.
as Licenser of the Printing-press, 1663; Selectman, from 1660 to 1672; Representative 1649, 1651, in which last year he was Speaker of the House; an Assistant from 1652 to 1686 excepting 1676, in which the prejudice against the Praying Indians, whom he befriended, prevented his election. He was elected Captain of the Cambridge band, or military company, before 1652, and was described by Johnson as a Kentish soldier, a very forward man to advance martial discipline, and. withal the truths of Christ. He became Major of the Middlesex Regiment in 1676, and was very active in raising and furnishing troops in Philip's War. In 1681 he was appointed Major-general of all the military force of the Colony, and was the last who held that office under the old charter. He was trusted by Oliver Cromwell as a confidential agent, and was selected by him to assist in executing his favorite project of transplanting a colony from New England to Jamaica. He visited England twice, partly at least on pub
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