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The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 5. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 44 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 36 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 1. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 36 0 Browse Search
John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison 36 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 34 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 2. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 28 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 28 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 22 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 20 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 18 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Christ or search for Christ in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
for the last time, that in a few short hours they would take the last embrace and say farewell forever. Dr. Leacock concluded his impressive discourse with words of encouragement and advice, evincing a keen and sometimes almost worldly appreciation of the occasion. He enjoined upon all to remember that we were educated to be gentlemen, and it behooved all to bring back their characters as soldiers and as gentlemen, unblemished with their arms. Remember, said he, that the first convert to Christ from the Gentiles was a soldier. Inscribe the Cross upon your banners, for you are fighting for liberty. May God protect you in your absence. Our hearts will follow you, our ears will be open for tidings of your condition, and our prayers will ascend for your safety and return. After the discourse, the colors presented by the ladies were placed in front of the chancel, and the benediction pronounced, the entire congregation rising. Monday, the 27th day of May, 1861, the twenty-first
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of the history of the Washington Artillery. (search)
for the last time, that in a few short hours they would take the last embrace and say farewell forever. Dr. Leacock concluded his impressive discourse with words of encouragement and advice, evincing a keen and sometimes almost worldly appreciation of the occasion. He enjoined upon all to remember that we were educated to be gentlemen, and it behooved all to bring back their characters as soldiers and as gentlemen, unblemished with their arms. Remember, said he, that the first convert to Christ from the Gentiles was a soldier. Inscribe the Cross upon your banners, for you are fighting for liberty. May God protect you in your absence. Our hearts will follow you, our ears will be open for tidings of your condition, and our prayers will ascend for your safety and return. After the discourse, the colors presented by the ladies were placed in front of the chancel, and the benediction pronounced, the entire congregation rising. Monday, the 27th day of May, 1861, the twenty-first
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of the Lee Memorial Association. (search)
so often expressed, that Art is yet crude in America, can afford to praise this master-piece of the Richmond sculptor, having no better or truer idea of it than mere photographs can give—if Roman critics have words of commendation for Ezekiel's Christ, and his Religious Liberty— where is our pride in the genius of our sons, that we do not do vastly more than simply re-echo this applause? Mr. Valentine is, it must be remembered, only forty-one years old, and can hardly be said to have yet attlemen this simple expression of our body, letting them know how cordially we appreciate their high-toned proposals? Commending the entire enterprise and all identified with it to God's favor and blessing, I am truly your friend and brother in Christ, W. N. Pendleton, Chairman Executive Committee. The removal from the studio to the depot on the afternoon of April the 13th, 1875, was thus described in the Richmond Dispatch of the next day: This event attracted to the neighborhood of