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J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 528 2 Browse Search
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians 261 11 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 199 3 Browse Search
William W. Bennett, A narrative of the great revival which prevailed in the Southern armies during the late Civil War 192 2 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 131 1 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 122 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 106 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 103 3 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 78 0 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 77 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Jesus Christ or search for Jesus Christ in all documents.

Your search returned 32 results in 9 document sections:

Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
ze in opinion; that I believe in an indwelling Christ, and in his righteousness alone; that I glory in nothing here below, save in Christ and him crucified; that I believe all the works of the devil ait is nowhere enjoined as a religious duty, by Christ or his apostles, upon any man, that he should uilt up of lively stones, the head of which is Christ; in worshipping God in spirit and in truth, wi and President, provided he has the spirit of Christ. Is it possible for [a man] to be governed byces, is perfectly consonant with the spirit of Christ. Thus they make no distinction between the prw corrupt is the new? If he has the spirit of Christ, how can he have, at the same time, the spirit of Satan? If he has put on Christ, what of iniquity has he not cast off? Instead, therefore, of [Christ] is righteous. And how righteous was Christ? Was any sin found in him? Did he not come e teachings, doctrines, examples, and spirit of Christ. Christ is its pattern, its theme, its hope, [3 more...]
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 6: third mission to England.—1846. (search)
ib. 14.87. O'Connell thundered against it before the British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Lib. 14.102. Society. A memorial to the nonentity known as the Churches of Christ in South Carolina, as representing those of other provinces, confederated in the United States of America, was drawn up and signed by more Lib. 14.67, 77. than 1hold the Declaration in their hand that all men are equal; then they enslave their brother, and whip him, and hunt him with bloodhounds, and profess the gospel of Christ. Now, no man can be excused for enslaving another, whether he be savage or civilized. (Great applause.) God has put a witness in every man's breast which protesting, for his Sunday's sowing, In the next world to go a-mowing The crop of all his meeting-going;— If the poor Church, by power enticed, Finds none so infidel as Christ, Quite backward reads his Gospel meek, (As 't were in Hebrew writ, not Greek,) Fencing the gallows and the sword With conscripts drafted from his word, And makes
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 8: the Anti-Sabbath Convention.—1848. (search)
e]—who are not willing that any man shall judge them in respect of a holy day, or the new moon, or the Sabbath—and who mean to stand fast in the liberty wherewith Christ hath made them free, and not to be entangled again with the yoke of bondage. Its supporters do not rely solely upon reason, argument, persuasion, but also upon tyled sacred or profane) to the contrary notwithstanding; holding, nevertheless, that Non-Resistance is taught in the precepts, and illustrated in the life, of Jesus Christ; and, therefore, that no man who rejects the doctrine is entitled to be called a Christian or a disciple of Christ. Why, he asked, should we go to a book to Christ. Why, he asked, should we go to a book to settle the character of war, when we could judge of it by its fruits? Lib. 19.3; cf. 19.6. As the spring approached, it became more and more manifest that Mr. Garrison's system had not recovered from the effects of his Ohio fever. Not only rest but treatment seemed necessary, and both inclination and counsel—H. C. Wright's a<
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 9: Father Mathew.—1849. (search)
ority, and you accepted them as a matter of course, sincerely and trustingly, as I did mine, and as nine-tenths of those who are born in Christendom do. Your theological views of man's depravity, the atonement, eternal punishment, the divinity of Christ, the inspiration of the Bible, etc., you received as confidingly as you did your Quaker views of peace, anti-slavery, temperance, etc.,—only, the latter you have advocated and carried out to an extent much beyond the ordinary teachings of Quakeri, and thought to silence us by triumphantly referring to the exterminating wars recorded in the Old Testament as expressly commanded by Jehovah. It was not conclusive for us to reply, that what was obligatory once is not necessarily so now—that Christ has superseded Moses, and now forbids all war; for the answer was: If, as you assert, war is, like slavery, idolatry, and the like, inherently wrong, a malum in se, how could it be enjoined by a sin-hating God in the days of Moses, unless his mor
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 10: the Rynders Mob.—1850. (search)
ned in reference to the other tests. His praises are sung in Louisiana, Alabama, and the other Southern States just as well as in Massachusetts. Captain Rynders—Are you aware that the slaves in the South have their prayer-meetings in honor of Christ? Mr. Garrison—Not a slaveholding or a slave-breeding Jesus. (Sensation.) The slaves believe in a Jesus that strikes off chains. In this country, Jesus has become obsolete. A profession in him is no longer a test. Who objects to his course is last session were the Rev. Henry Grew, Charles C. Burleigh, and Wendell Phillips. Mr. Burleigh's flowing beard and ringlets and eccentric costume especially evoked the buffoonery of the mob, and harmless personal indignities. Shave that tall Christ and make a wig for Garrison, Lib. 20:[78]. cried one; while Rynders, with arm around his neck, stroked his beard. Mr.Lib. 20:[78], 106; Nat. A. S. Standard, 10.202. Phillips's irreproachable appearance and famed eloquence did not save him, eithe
utest hearts succumb,—your position has put me in mind of a scene described by the apostle of Jesus Christ, when the devil took him up into a high mountain, etc., etc. Now, gentlemen, thus being ctry, in case of malignant assault, or whether she impartially disarms all mankind in the name of Christ, be the danger or suffering what it may. We are curious to know this, because our opinion of herto put away all wrath, to submit to every conceivable outrage without resistance, to suffer with Christ if they would reign with him. None of their advocates may seek to inspire them to imitate the exbellion and conflict for the white man? When it is the whites who are trodden in the dust, does Christ justify them in taking up arms to vindicate their rights? And when it is the blacks who are thus treated, does Christ require them to be patient, harmless, long-suffering, and forgiving? And are there two Christs? The work, towards its conclusion, contains some objectionable sentiments resp
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 13: the Bible Convention.—1853. (search)
and every vile emotion of the soul, throwing into the shade almost everything coming from the vilest of the vile that I have ever witnessed on any occasion or under any circumstances; venerable men, claiming to be holy men, the ambassadors of Jesus Christ, losing all self-respect and transforming themselves into the most unmannerly and violent spirits, merely on account of the sex of the individual who wished to address the assembly. On October 3, Mr. Garrison began a tour to the West Lib.and that the New Testament is a history, of a very low degree of credibility, of a man just as fallible as themselves, and who was mistaken and has misled the whole Christian world on many important nd that he is himself as good a judge of relig Christ—I say, when a Christian ather and mother their children believing such things, of what use will the Bible be to them in education? I moreover regret these things on account of their inevitable influence on the cause of Human Liberty. It is im
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 15: the Personal Liberty Law.—1855. (search)
Resolved, That Liberty and Slavery are in their nature Lib. 25.70, 78. antagonisms, which no power in the universe can reconcile; and that any effort to make peace, or to effect a compromise, between them is an insult to God, a crime against nature, and an outrage upon man. Resolved, That a Church or Government which accords the same rights and privileges to Slavery as to Liberty, is a house divided against itself, which cannot stand—is an attempt to pay equal honor to Belial and to Christ—is inherently corrupt and tyrannical, and deserving of universal execration. These resolutions were originally drafted for an Lib. 25.70. antislavery convention at Dover, N. H., on April 25. The sentiment they contain is anything but new from Mr. Ante, 2.338. Garrison's lips, but the phraseology arrests attention. The expression, a house divided against itself, may be said to have made the fortune of Lincoln as a statesman when uttered three years later. We are now far into the fift
m as a herd of buffaloes, but as poor, misguided, and lost men. We believe in his philosophy; we accept his instruction; we are thrilled by his example; we rejoice in his fidelity. How touching is the language of James!— Ye have condemned and James 5.6. killed the just; and he doth not resist you. And how melting to the soul is the declaration: He was led as a lamb to the Acts 8.32. slaughter ! And again: God commendeth his love towards us Rom. 5.8. in that, while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us. This New Testament argument, met with unsigned, would probably in no quarter of Christendom suggest anything but a Christian origin. But in this very year a book reviewer was allowed, in the N. Y. Independent of Jan. 3, 1856, to say: Of the converts to Spiritualism whose previous belief is mentioned in this book, almost all of them were infidels, and some of them, like Garrison and Robert Owen, of a most degraded class (Lib. 26: 22, 51). Joshua Leavitt, D. D., was at this ti