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James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Book 1: he keepeth the sheep. (search)
to form your thoughts, words, and actions by its wise and holy precepts, is my best wish and most earnest prayer to Him in whose care I leave you. Amen. From your affectionate father, April 2, 1857. John Brown. This is dated two years ago; but the principles which dictated it were permanent. Almost on the eve of his last battle, October 1, 1859, he wrote home to his daughter Anne, in a letter which I saw, Anne, I want you first of all to become a sincere, humble, and consistent Christian--and then [this is characteristic] to acquire good and efficient business habits. Save this, to remember your father by, Anne. God Almighty bless and save you all. John Brown's orthodoxy. John Brown is almost the only radical abolitionist I have ever known who was not more or less radical in religious matters also. His theology was Puritan, like his practice; and accustomed as we now are to see Puritan doctrines and Puritan virtues separately exhibited, it seems quite strange to b
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 5: North Elba. (search)
to form your thoughts, words, and actions by its wise and holy precepts, is my best wish and most earnest prayer to Him in whose care I leave you. Amen. From your affectionate father, April 2, 1857. John Brown. This is dated two years ago; but the principles which dictated it were permanent. Almost on the eve of his last battle, October 1, 1859, he wrote home to his daughter Anne, in a letter which I saw, Anne, I want you first of all to become a sincere, humble, and consistent Christian--and then [this is characteristic] to acquire good and efficient business habits. Save this, to remember your father by, Anne. God Almighty bless and save you all. John Brown's orthodoxy. John Brown is almost the only radical abolitionist I have ever known who was not more or less radical in religious matters also. His theology was Puritan, like his practice; and accustomed as we now are to see Puritan doctrines and Puritan virtues separately exhibited, it seems quite strange to b
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 8: the conquering pen. (search)
ect of the gallows. Men cannot imprison, or chain, or hang the soul. I go joyfully in behalf of millions that have no rights that this great and glorious, this Christian Republic is bound to respect. Strange change in morals, political as well as Christian, since 1776! I look forward to other changes to take place in God's goodChristian, since 1776! I look forward to other changes to take place in God's good time, fully believing that the fashion of this world passeth away. Farewell. May God abundantly bless you all! Your friend, John Brown. Letter to his son Jason. Charlestown, Jefferson Co., Va., Nov. 22, 1859 Dear Children: Your most welcome letters of the 16th inst. I have just received, and I bless God thaear a close. You may wonder, are there no ministers of the gospel here? I answer, No. There are no ministers of Christ here. These ministers who profess to be Christian, and hold slaves or advocate slavery, I cannot abide them. My knees will not bend in prayer with them while their hands are stained with the blood of souls. Th