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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 34 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 32 4 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 23 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 6 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 12 2 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 7 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 13, 1865., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 6 0 Browse Search
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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 9: the Red River expedition. (search)
cond Iowa, and Twenty-fourth Missouri. Then the sounds of the skirmish-firing died away, but the lull was brief, and at a few minutes past five o'clock the Confederates burst out of the woods in heavy lines in all directions, The Confederate line of battle was as follows: General Green's division, on the extreme left; that of the slain Mouton, under General Polignac, a French officer, on Green's right; next to him General Walker, and a division of Arkansas and Missouri troops, under General Churchill, on the extreme right. driving in the National skirmishers by two charging columns, and outflanking, by a quick oblique movement, Emory's left,.held by Benedict's brigade, This was composed of the One Hundred and Sixty-second (Benedict's own), One Hundred and Sixty-fifth, and One Hundred and Seventy-third New York, and Thirtieth Maine. fell upon it with crushing force. Outnumbered as well as outflanked, and being without any near support, the brigade fell steadily back, fighting ga
under Col. Siegel, had taken position, in close proximity to Colonel Churchill's regiment, Colonel Greer's Texan Rangers, and 679 mounted Mi, under Gen. Pearce, the Louisiana regiment of Col. Hebert, and Col. Churchill's regiment of mounted riflemen. These gallant officers and theere posted. Far on the right, Siegel had opened his battery upon Churchill's and Greer's regiments, and had gradually made his way to the Sp. To this point McIntosh's regiment, under Lieut.Col. Embry, and Churchill's regiment on foot, Gratiot's regiment and McRae's battalion werely. Capt. Hinson of the Louisiana regiment, Capt. McAlexander of Churchill's regiment, Captains Bell and Brown of Pearce's brigade, Lieuts. ess of the day. The commanders of regiments of my own brigade, Cols. Churchill, Greer, Embry, McIntosh, Hebert, and McRae led their differentrvest before the sickle. My own regiment was then decimated, and Churchill's and McIntosh's Arkansas regiments suffered most severely. Here
f the enemy, under Col. Siegel, had taken position, in close proximity to Colonel Churchill's regiment, Colonel Greer's Texan Rangers, and 679 mounted Missourians, usas infantry, under Gen. Pearce, the Louisiana regiment of Col. Hebert, and Col. Churchill's regiment of mounted riflemen. These gallant officers and their brave sol the enemy were posted. Far on the right, Siegel had opened his battery upon Churchill's and Greer's regiments, and had gradually made his way to the Springfield roen them back. To this point McIntosh's regiment, under Lieut.Col. Embry, and Churchill's regiment on foot, Gratiot's regiment and McRae's battalion were sent to thePrice slightly. Capt. Hinson of the Louisiana regiment, Capt. McAlexander of Churchill's regiment, Captains Bell and Brown of Pearce's brigade, Lieuts. Walton and W to the success of the day. The commanders of regiments of my own brigade, Cols. Churchill, Greer, Embry, McIntosh, Hebert, and McRae led their different regiments i
, and poured a terrific fire into the enemy's right, while Woodruff's Arkansas battery mowed down his left. At this point of time General McCulloch came up, and directed Slack's division to charge Totten's battery in front, and the Arkansas troops on the right. This was the most terrific storm of grape and musketry ever poured out upon the ranks of any American troops. On both sides the men were mowed down like the ripe harvest before the sickle. My own regiment was then decimated, and Churchill's and McIntosh's Arkansas regiments suffered most severely. Here General Lyon was killed, Totten's battery driven from the heights, and his whole force scattered in flight. This ended the bloody strife of that most bloody day. Never has a greater victory crowned the efforts of liberty and equal rights. The best blood of the land has been poured out to water afresh the tree of liberty. This is only a synopsis of the fight — it is impossible to give you details; I cannot do justice to al
by a single shot. Behind a tree a few yards distant was stretched a corpse, with two thirds of its head blown away by the explosion of a shell, and near it a musket, broken into three pieces. Still further along was the body of a rebel soldier, who had been killed by a grapeshot through the breast. A letter had fallen from his pocket, which, on examination, proved to be a long and well-written love-epistle from his betrothed in East-Tennessee. It was addressed to Pleasant J. Williams, Churchill's regiment, Fayetteville, Arkansas. Around him in all directions were his dead and dying comrades, some stretched at full length on the turf, and others contorted as if in extreme agony. The earth was thickly strewn with shot and fragments of shell. The bursting of shells had set fire to the dry leaves on the ground, and the woods were burning in every direction. Efforts were made to remove the wounded before the flames should reach them, and nearly all were taken to places of safety
hem to ground their arms. Immediately after, meeting General Churchill, commandant of the post, he referred him to me, from e Fort, sent for me and surrendered to me in person. General Churchill, of the rebel army, surrendered to the military commaCommander-in-Chief of the confederate forces was Brigadier-General Churchill; Captain Ben. Johnson, Adjutant-General, Captain, and twenty guns. The post was an important one, and Gen. Churchill affirms he had orders to hold it to the last. Little ts, and because Lieut.-Gen. Holmes had telegraphed Brig.-General Churchill, commanding, to hold the position until all shouldn betrayed into the hands of our enemy. Our gallant Gen. Churchill had determined to fight, and to fight to the last, andell as by the crashing of musketry. A shout is heard. Churchill, who holds a charmed life amid a shower of bullets and shwardice, the white flag, exclaiming at the same time: General Churchill says, raise the white flag. The enemy saw it, and, b
n, now divided into Parsons's (Missouri) and Churchill's (Arkansas) division, was ordered to Shreve the roads fork to Marshall and Shreveport. Churchill's and Parsons's divisions were sent to him. ion to watch and pursue the enemy. Parsons, Churchill, and Walker arrived at Shreveport on the sixinden, Parsons in the centre via Benton, and Churchill on the left, following Red River thirty-fivethe river. The firing became more general. Churchill's division was thrown forward. I give you and Parsons's division was put into action on Churchill's right. Word was sent back to General Walks brigade was held in reserve in the rear of Churchill and Parsons. The cavalry brigade was mostlyfore Walker reached the enemy, Parsons's and Churchill's divisions were driven back. They got intow immediately; they were in great disorder. Churchill's men had been again collected, and skirmish insisted that with Walker's, Parsons's, and Churchill's divisions, he could overwhelm Banks, who w[7 more...]
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Engagements of the Civil War with losses on both sides December, 1860-August, 1862 (search)
unded. September 12-13, 1861: Cheat Mountain, W. Va. Union, 13th, 14th, 15th, and 17th Ind., 3d, 6th, 24th, and 25th Ohio, 2d W. Va. Confed., Va. Vols. commanded by Gen. W. W. Loring. Losses: Union 9 killed, 12 wounded, 60 missing. Confed. No record found.. September 12-20, 1861: Lexington, Mo. Union, 23d Ill., 8th, 25th, and 27th Mo., 13th and 14th Mo. Home Guards, Berry's and Van Horne's Mo. Cav., 1st Ill. Cav. Confed., Parsons' and Rains' Divisions, Bledsoe's, Churchill's, Guibor's, Kelly's, Kneisley's and Clark's batteries. Losses: Union 42 killed, 108 wounded, 1,624 missing and captured. Confed. 25 killed, 75 wounded. September 13, 1861: Booneville, Mo. Union, Mo. Home Guards. Confed., Gen. Price's Mo. State Guard. Losses: Union 1 killed, 4 wounded. Confed. 12 killed, 30 wounded. September 14, 1861: Confederate Privateer Judah destroyed near Pensacola, Fla., by the U. S. Flagship Colorado. Losses: Union 3 killed, 15 w
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address on the character of General R. E. Lee, delivered in Richmond on Wednesday, January 19th, 1876, the anniversary of General Lee's birth (search)
, made to future ages and other countries. Fit is it that we trust to that great verdict, seeing that nothing less than the tribunal of mankind can judge this man, who was born not for a period, but for all time; not for a country, but for the world; not for a people, but for the human race. Not for him shall the Arch of Triumph rise; not for him Columns of Victory, telling through monumental bronze the hideous tale of tears and blood that grins from the skull pyramids of Dahomey. Not to his honor shall extorted tributes carve the shaft or mould the statue; but this day a grateful people give of their poverty gladly, that in pure marble, or time-defying bronze, future generations may see the counterfeit presentment of this man — the ideal and bright consummate flower of our civilization; not an Alexander, it may be; nor Napoleon, nor Timour, nor Churchill — greater far than they, thank heaven — the brother and the equal of Sidney and of Falkland, of Hampden and of Washing
ut a mile in front of Pleasant Hill, which occupies a plateau a mile wide from west to east along the Mansfield road. His lines extended across the plateau from the highest ground on the west, his left, to a wooded height on the right of the Mansfield road. Winding along in front of this position was a dry gully cut by winter rains, bordered by a thick growth of young pines. This was held by his advanced infantry, his main line and guns being on the plateau. The force of General Taylor—Churchill's brigade having joined him now—amounted to twelve thousand five hundred men against eighteen thousand of General Banks, among them the fresh corps of General A. J. Smith. The action commenced about 4:30 P. M. It was the plan of General Taylor, as no offensive movement on the part of the enemy was anticipated, to turn both his flanks and subject him to a concentric fire and overwhelm him. The right was successfully turned, but our force on his left did not proceed far enough to outflank h
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