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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 2: Parentage and Family.—the father. (search)
-bills, including board in commons and tuition, varied from twenty-eight to thirty-six dollars. In college his compositions were largely poetical. Among his themes of this kind were, Non omnia possumus omnes, Winter, and a Dialogue between Churchill the Warrior and Churchill the Poet. At the end of his Junior year, he delivered before the Speaking Club a valedictory poem, on the occasion of his classmates leaving it. At the exhibition in September, 1795, his part was a poem, entitled The rom office, in terms appreciative of the sheriff's personal and official character. The sheriff's sureties, on his official bond, were William Sullivan, William Minot, Samuel Hubbard, William Prescott, John Heard, Jr., Timothy Fuller, and Asaph Churchill. These well known names show his high standing in the confidence of the community. Mr. Sumner's home life, which before his appointment as sheriff had been regulated with severe economy, was now more generously maintained. Twice a year,
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 36: first session in Congress.—welcome to Kossuth.—public lands in the West.—the Fugitive Slave Law.—1851-1852. (search)
look to your legislative future with a different feeling from that with which they followed you to your seat in December. R. H. Dana, Jr., wrote: I am glad you had an opportunity to make your speech on a subject of so great general interest, on which you are so well informed, and one disconnected with party issues. I am glad you were so short, and kept so closely to the only point; it is beautifully expressed. The speech drew from a college friend of the class graduating after him—Asaph Churchill, a lawyer of high repute a note warmly commending its assertion of the policy of nonintervention, with a reminiscence of their association at the Law School, which deserves to be preserved:— I am reminded of a conversation we once had at the Law School. Several of us were debating as to the course of life we had best pursue,—what, profession or occupation or line of conduct would best enable us to achieve greatness, which we understood as being wealth, power, place, fame. You p<
h, adm. to ch. at organization, 9 Sept. 1739; the Miss Deborah, d. 25 Apr. 1795, a. 92, perhaps gr.—dau. of Robert Wilson. See Paige, 694; Wyman, 248, 1040. Churchill, Asaph, of Milton, and Mary Gardner of Charlestown, m. 10 May, 1810. See Wyman's Charlestown, 216. Clark or Clarke, Richard, of Watertown, and w. Eliza-Beth,estown farms, were m. here 5 Apr. 1781. Had Edward, bap. here 18 Aug. 1782, d. 9 May, 1790, a. 8; Mary, bap. here 12 Sept. 1783, the Mary, of Charlestown, m. Asaph Churchill, of Milton, 10 May, 1810; Edward, bap. 3 July, 1791, m. (he of Chas.) Patience Converse, of Medford, 23 Mar. 1817; [Edward Gardner of Charlestown, d. 12 Nov. n Hubbard. 31 Aug. 1823. Leach, Alpheus, m. Eunice Russell, 30 Oct. 1805. A child of Alpheus, d. 8 Apr. 1806, a. 3 mos. Zadok, m. Mary Frost. 3 Apr. 1810. Churchill W., m. Lydia Swan, 21 May, 1818. Thomas, m. Mary Russell, 22 Apr. 1821. Mary, was adm. Pct. ch. and bap. 21 Nov. 1824, and d. 31 Aug. 1825, a. 24 Libbeus, of
arteret and DeCarteret, 22, 27, 38, 167, 168, 199, 202, 203, 279, 318 Carthew, 16, 16 Cassidy, 348 Ceiley, 166 Center, 68 Chadwick, 149,184, 203 Chaffin, 344, 346 Chamberlain and Chamberlin, 9,199, 103,229 Chambers, 203 Champney, 20, 203, 236, 279 Chandler, 145, 203, 234 Charles Edward, 60 Chase, 140, 171 Chauncey, 31 Cheever, 203, 217 Chick, 348 Child and Childs, 108, 203, 204, 236, 244, 276, 284, 336 Chisholm, 340 Chrissen, 28, 204 Churchill, 204, 251 Churchman, 348 Claffey, 348 Clancy, 344, 346 Clap, 24 Clark and Clarke, 58, 60, 86, 107, 124, 140, 164, 166, 171, 177, 184, 196, 197, 204, 224, 240, 241, 272, 280, 298, 314, 315, 341, 343, 360 Clay, 204, 301 Cleaves, 68, 71 Clinton, 342 Cobb, 349 Codner, 204, 261 Coffin, 204 Coggin, 206, 329 Cogswell, 206 Colburn, 348 Cole, 110, 112, 120, 131, 206, 296, 349 Coleman, 346 Collins, 8, 12, 18, 206, 276, 339 Colman, 31 Comee, 20