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Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 50 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 45 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 7, 1863., [Electronic resource] 13 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 6, 1863., [Electronic resource] 13 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 9 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 9 3 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 8 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 2 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for T. J. Churchill or search for T. J. Churchill in all documents.

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ompted him to quit his strong position for one still farther advanced, at Rogersville, where his men slept on their arms that night. Next morning, he advanced half a mile farther, and here engaged Smith's entire command, with no chance of success. His force was quite equal in numbers and in guns to Smith's, but in nothing else. He attempted to flank the Rebel right, but was defeated with loss by Col. Preston Smith's brigade; when his right was successfully turned by the Rebel left, Gen. T. J. Churchill, and routed in a daring charge; whereupon our whole line gave way and retreated. The Rebel Gen. Pat. Cleburne, afterward so distinguished, was here badly wounded in the face, and succeeded in his command by Col. Smith. Gen. Cruft, with the 95th Ohio, had reached the field just before, and shared in this defeat; but he had three more regiments coming up as our line gave way. Using two of these as a rear-guard, Manson attempted to halt and reform just beyond Rogersville; but soon sa
deep, with strong easemates, a banquette for infantry, and a cordon of ride-pits. But its guns were too few and light, and their powder inferior; so that Gen. T. J. Churchill, who commanded, had never a chance to held it, with his garrison of hardly 5,000, But 3,000 effectives, he reports. against the army that now advanced f, under Gen. Burbridge, were swarming over the intrenchments on the east, barely in advance of Sherman's and Steele's leading regiments on the north and west. Churchill had received from Lt.-Gen. T. H. Holmes [Little Rock], commanding in Arkansas, a telegraphic order to hold on till help arrived, or till all are dead --A piece oenalty of the law. Such swagger had for years diffused an impression that the South-rons were less brave than they were proved by the stern ordeal of battle. Churchill reports his loss at not exceeding 60 killed. and 75 to 80 wounded, and thinks ours was from 1,500 to 2,000. McClernand reports his spoils at 5,000 The Missou
ttahoochee river, Johnston retreats across, 630. Chattanooga, Bragg marches to, 213; Rosecrans's preparations for the campaign, 404; map of the positions held by Rosecrans's and Bragg's armies at, 416; Sherman reenforces Grant at, 437; strength of Sherman's army at, 625. Cheatham, Gen. B. F., commands a division at Perryville, 219; at Stone River, 274-5. Chicago Democratic National Convention of 1864, spirit of the, 666 to 669. Chickamauga, battle of, 415-25; losses at, 425. Churchill, Gen. T. J., surrenders Fort Hindman, 293; his losses, 294. Cincinnati, gunboat, sunk, 56. Cincinnati, cutter, sunk, 314. Clarke, Gen. Charles (Rebel), killed at Baton Rouge, 103. Clarke, Col., Mich., killed at Port Hudson, 333. Clark, Col., reports Rebel movements, 180. Clarksville, Tenn., captured by guerrillas, 213. Cleburne, Major-Gen. Pat. (Rebel), wounded, 221; commands division at Stone River, 274; turns on Hooker at Ringgold, 445; killed at Franklin, 683. C