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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
John F. Hume, The abolitionists together with personal memories of the struggle for human rights 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 2 0 Browse Search
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Chapter 20: Missouri In his interesting, though rather melodramatic, romance, The Crisis, Winston Churchill tells the imaginary story of a young lawyer who went from New England to St. Louis, and settled there shortly before the outbreak of the Civil War. Having an abundance of leisure, and being an Abolitionist, he devoted a portion of the time that was not absorbed by his profession to writing articles on slavery for the Missouri Democrat, which, notwithstanding its name, was the organ of the Missouri emancipationists, and lived in part on the money he received as compensation for that work. That in part describes the author's experience. He was at that time a young lawyer in St. Louis, to which place he had come from the North, and those who have read the earlier chapters of this work are aware that he was an Abolitionist. Having a good deal of time that was not taken up by his professional employments, he occupied a portion of it in writing Anti-Slavery contributions to t
mpbell, David, 202. Campbell, John R., 202. Capron, Effingham C., 202. Carlisle, Earl of, 18. Chapman, Mrs. Henry, 33. Charcoals, Missouri, 159; delegation to President, 162, 166; fight for Free Missouri, 162; appeal to President for protection, 166-168. Chase, Salmon P., 10, 13, 14, 59-61, 148, 205; financial policy, 60; espousal of Abolitionism, 61; and third party, 64; election to United States Senate, 206. Child, David Lee, 204. Child, Lydia Maria, 204. Chittenden, L. E., 134. Churchill's Crisis, 157. Civil War, 11; due to Abolitionists, 12. Clay, Henry, 2, 6. Claybanks, 159; exclusion from National Convention, 169. Coffin, Joshua, 201. Coffin, Levi, 197-198; President of the Underground railroad, 97. Colonization, 128-135; Society, 128; and England, 130-132; Lincoln's opinion, 133; experiments, 133-134. Colonizationists, pretended friendship for negroes, 130. Compromise of 1850, 6. Conover, A. J., 205. Cotton-gin, invention of, 31. Cox, Abram L., 203, 205. Cra
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
King Noanett (1896), James Lane Allen's The choir invisible (1897), Charles Major's When Knighthood was in flower (1898), Mary Johnston's Prisoners of Hope (1898) and To have and to hold (1899), Paul Leicester Ford's Janice Meredith (1899), Winston Churchill's Richard Carvel (1899) and The crisis (1901), Booth Tarkington's Monsieur Beaucaire (1900), Maurice Thompson's Alice of Old Vincennes (1900), Henry Harland's The Cardinal's Snuff-box (1901). In part they were an American version of the movp XI The manager thought there was certainty in a play based on a book which had sold into the thousands. The book market was full of literary successes and was drawn upon for the stage. Mary Johnston's To have and to hold and Audrey; Winston Churchill's Richard Carvel and The crisis; Charles Major's When Knighthood was in flower; George W. Cable's The Cavalier; John Fox's Trail of the Lonesome Pine; Richard Harding Davis's Soldiers of fortune—the list might be stretched to interminable
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
Christian Union, 325 Christmas Trail, The, 161 Christophe Colombe, 185 Christopher Columbus and how he received and imparted the spirit of democracy, 187 Christopher Crowfield. See Stowe, Harriet Beecher Christy, David, 341 Churchill, Winston, 91, 287 Cicero, 445, 463, 471, 475, 538 Cid, 591 Cigarette-Maker's romance, a, 88 Cincinnati Volksblatt, 578 Cinderella man, the, 292 Circuit Rider, the, 76 City, the, 284 Civil government in great Britain, 354 Civil Go Crawford, F. M., 86-89, 316 Crawford, Thomas, 86 Crayon, the, 488 Creed of a free trader, 355 Creighton, J. E., 240 Crime against Kansas, 346 Criminal aggression; by whom committed, 363 Crisis, the (M. Carey), 433 Crisis, the (Churchill), 91, 287 Crispinus, 445 Critical period of American history, the, 192-3 Criticism and fiction, 83 Croly, George, 308 Croly, Herbert, 365 Cromwell, 380, 382 Cronau, Rudolph, 579 Crook, Gen., 159 Crosby, Fanny J., 496 Cr
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises, XXIV. a half-century of American literature (1857-1907) (search)
s of them, emerge and disappear, like the flash of a revolving light; you must make the most of it while you have it. The highways of literature are spread over, said Holmes, with the shells of dead novels, each of which has been swallowed at a mouthful by the public, and is done with. In America, as in England, the leading literary groups are just now to be found less among the poets than among the writers of prose fiction. Of these younger authors, we have in America such men as Winston Churchill, Robert Grant, Hamlin Garland, Owen Wister, Arthur S. Pier, and George Wasson; any one of whom may at any moment surprise us by doing something better than the best he has before achieved. The same promise of a high standard is visible in women, among whom may be named not merely those of maturer standing, as Harriet Prescott Spofford, who is the leader, but her younger sisters, Mary Wilkins Freeman, Edith Wharton, and Josephine Preston Peabody. The drama also is advancing with rapid