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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 34 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 32 4 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 23 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 6 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 12 2 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 7 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 13, 1865., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Churchill or search for Churchill in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 2 document sections:

e. The next day, the 4th of July, McCulloch and Pearce entered Missouri with Churchill's mounted Confederate regiment, Gratiot's Arkansas infantry, Carroll's mounted Price pressed forward to his relief. On approaching Neosho, McCulloch sent Churchill with two companies to capture a company Sigel had left there. This ChurchillChurchill did without firing a gun. He not only took 137 prisoners, but what was of more importance, captured 510 stand of arms and seven wagons loaded with army supplies. Af the Confederates. He planted a battery on a small hill within 500 yards of Churchill's camp, disposed his men so as to capture every one coming or going, and waity, which was followed in a moment by the guns of Sigel, who hadopened fire on Churchill and Greer and Brown, and was driving them in confusion out of the little vallaged fiercely. Though hard pressed, Price had not yielded a foot of ground. Churchill, who held a position on the left of the line, dismounted his men and moved th
gun battery, Capt. A. A. Lesueur. Colonel Burns commanded the brigade. General Churchill's Arkansas division was at the same time sent to Shreveport. The two divn was on the extreme right of Taylor's line, while next to it on the left was Churchill's Arkansas division, the two divisions forming Churchill's corps. The battleChurchill's corps. The battle opened with a heavy artillery fire, and a charge of a regiment of Texas cavalry on the enemy's center. The charge was repulsed, but the regiment formed again behind rising ground and charged gallantly, with the same result. Churchill then ordered Parsons to charge with his division, which he did, driving the enemy before him,n Spring General Smith—who had come up from Shreveport, bringing Parsons' and Churchill's divisions with him—conceived the idea of sending three brigades of cavalry gh this open field, with the enemy protected by the timber on the other side, Churchill's division was ordered to charge. They went in with a rush, but the mud was