hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 9 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 9 results in 2 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Clark, Charles Edgar 1843- (search)
Clark, Charles Edgar 1843- Naval officer; born in Bradford, Vt., Aug. 10, 1843; was Charles Edgar Clark. trained in the naval academy in 1860-63, becoming ensign in the latter year. In 1863-65 he served on the sloop Ossipee, and participated Charles Edgar Clark. trained in the naval academy in 1860-63, becoming ensign in the latter year. In 1863-65 he served on the sloop Ossipee, and participated in the battle of Mobile Bay, Aug. 5, 1864, and the bombardment of Fort Morgan, Aug. 23. He was promoted lieutenant in 1867; lieutenantcommander in 1868; commander in 1881; and captain, June 21, 1896; and was given command of the Monterey. He held trip of any battle-ship afloat. Despite her long voyage, the Oregon immediately joined Admiral Sampson's squadron. Captain Clark's excellent discipline was evident in the effective work against the Spanish fleet at Santiago. In company with the ntiago. In company with the Brooklyn, he gave chase to the Vizcaya, the Colon, and the flag-ship of Admiral Cervera, the Maria Teresa, and aided in the destruction of each. In 1899 Captain Clark was assigned to duty at the navy-yard, Philadelphia.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Schley, Winfield Scott 1839- (search)
harbor. Nineteenth. I am glad to say that the injury supposed to be below the waterline was due to a water valve being opened from some unknown cause and flooding the compartment. The injury to the belt is found to be only slight and the leak small. Twentieth. I beg to enclose a list of the officers and crew who participated in the combat of July 3, 1898. Twenty-first. I cannot close this report without mentioning in high terms of praise the splendid conduct and support of Capt. C. E. Clark, of the Oregon. Her speed was wonderful, and her accurate fire splendidly destructive. Very respectfully, W. S. Schley. The Court of inquiry. The controversy between the friends of Rear-Admirals Sampson and Schley, noted in the sketch of the former, led to criticisms on the conduct of the latter during the Santiago fight, which were considered by his friends exceedingly unjust. Personally he took no notice of the reflections upon his professional conduct, declaring that the