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Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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fe, on penalty of twenty pounds, to be forfeited and paid to the County Treasurer; and to pay the costs of the Court. Instead of departing from the country, as required by this order of Court, Johnson contracted to serve the society another year, in the printing-office. He was accordingly brought before the County Court Oct. 1663, and compelled to give bonds in the sum of £ 40, to depart this jurisdiction, according to the order of the Court, within six weeks time next ensuing, or by Christopher Clark's ship, now bound for England. A higher authority now interposed. At the session of the General Court, commencing 20 Oct. 1663, an order was passed, to wit: Upon perusal of the Commissioners' letter to the honorable Corporation in England, and Mr. Eliot's motion, touching Marmaduke Johnson, printer, informing that the said Corporation have contracted with the said Johnson for one year, expiring 10th August next; it is hereby ordered, that there be a suspension of the execution of an
fe, on penalty of twenty pounds, to be forfeited and paid to the County Treasurer; and to pay the costs of the Court. Instead of departing from the country, as required by this order of Court, Johnson contracted to serve the society another year, in the printing-office. He was accordingly brought before the County Court Oct. 1663, and compelled to give bonds in the sum of £ 40, to depart this jurisdiction, according to the order of the Court, within six weeks time next ensuing, or by Christopher Clark's ship, now bound for England. A higher authority now interposed. At the session of the General Court, commencing 20 Oct. 1663, an order was passed, to wit: Upon perusal of the Commissioners' letter to the honorable Corporation in England, and Mr. Eliot's motion, touching Marmaduke Johnson, printer, informing that the said Corporation have contracted with the said Johnson for one year, expiring 10th August next; it is hereby ordered, that there be a suspension of the execution of an
officers: Capt. T. M. Riley; Capts. E. B. Mosley and J. M. Gilchrist; Lieuts. Burton Goode and John A. Kirkland; E. P. Jones and J. F. Christian, Adjt. C. J. Pegues acted with conspicuous gallantry; Lieut. Albert J. Wilcox, a most gallant officer, was killed on the-field. Entire loss Gettysburg, 21 killed, 121 wounded. (598) Report of Maj. Eugene Blackford says: Though all acted so well, I would scarcely like to make a distinction, yet I must call your attention to the conduct of Sergt. Christopher Clark, commanding a company from the Fifth Alabama regiment. He handled his company with great skill and courage and would well fill a commission. No. 45—(922, 1059) General Rodes' division, Second army corps, General Ewell, Colonel Hall in command of regiment. No. 48—(399, 818, 838) Assignment as above, September and October, 1863. Thirty-one wounded in engagements at Payne's Farm and Mine Run, November 26th to December 3d. (889, 890) Highly commended in report of Col. J. M. H
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Official reports of the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
closed, as they have been returned on the lists of the respective regiments. Abundant supplies of ammunition were obtained by sending details through the town to collect cartridge boxes. At daylight on the 4th I was ordered to fall back through the town and deploy in front of the new line of battle on the hills to the west-this was accomplished just before sunrise. Though all acted so well, I scarcely like to make a distinction, yet I must call your attention to the conduct of Sergeant Christopher Clark, commanding the company from the Fifth Alabama Regiment. He handled his company throughout with great skill and courage, and would well fill a commission. I have the honor to be very respectfully, Eugene Blackford, Major Fifth Alabama, Commanding Battalion of Sharpshooters. Report of Colonel Oates, Fifteenth Alabama regiment. headquarters Fifteenth Alabama regiment, August 8th, 1863. Lieutenant B. Paterson, A. A. A. General. I have the honor to report, in obedie
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.6 (search)
nia Harris. His father was Dr. Micajah Clark, a distinguished physician of his generation, born in Albemarle county, the son of William Clark, who saw service in the Revolution. William Clark was the son of Micajah Clark, the son of Captain Christopher Clark, who patented many thousand acres of Crown lands, and located some of the tracts in what is now Albemarle county, near Charlottesville, in 1702-4, and was said to have been the pioneer settler of that county. This is one of the historical Clark families of Virginia, which furnished many legislators, generals and governors of States. Micajah H. Clark was a Hill-cat (as the uptown boys of the city were then known), and his first taste of war was in the battles between the Hill-cats and the Butcher-cats and Basin-cats —a distinctive Richmond war waged with varying fortunes for more than one hundred years, the cats of all three armies finally fighting side by side in the war between the States. New pages of history. In