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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 6: Essex County. (search)
rsed by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $854.95; in 1862, $3,036.44; in 1863, $3,632.42; in 1864, $2,400.00; in 1865, $1,100.00. Total amount, $11,023.81. Topsfield Incorporated Oct. 18, 1650. Population in 1860, 1,292; in 1865, 1,212. Valuation in 1860, $624,769; in 1865, $687,610. The selectmen in 1861 were John Wright, A. S. Peabody, Dudley Bradstreet; in 1862, 1863, and 1864, A. S. Peabody, Samuel Todd, Dudley Bradstreet; in 1865, Jacob Foster, J. W. Batchelder, David Clark. The town-clerk during all these years was J. P. Towne. The town-treasurer in 1861 was Benjamin Kimball; in 1862, 1863, and 1864, Nehemiah Balch; in 1865, Jeremiah Balch. 1861. A legal town-meeting was held May 17th, at which the following preamble and resolutions were adopted:— Considering the present position of our country, not as waging war against the South, nor a party device, but an essay of the people to sustain their own rights, preserve their own institutions, give ef
Rev. David Clark Rev. David Clark, the second pastor of the church, was born in 1832, and came to our society at the age of twenty-seven. His ministry with us began in 1859, and continued but two years, being the shortest pastorate in the society's history. He came to us direct from college, and gained much experience in this, his first field of labor, which was of help in his after lifework in the Christian ministry. He died in 1898. Rev. David Clark Rev. David Clark, the second pastor of the church, was born in 1832, and came to our society at the age of twenty-seven. His ministry with us began in 1859, and continued but two years, being the shortest pastorate in the society's history. He came to us direct from college, and gained much experience in this, his first field of labor, which was of help in his after lifework in the Christian ministry. He died in 1898.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Roster of the companies. (search)
n Flynn, died in Camp Douglas, January 8, 1864, of congestive chills; fifth, Milton Vivion. Corporals—First, J. S. Gamboe; second, Wm. B. Willis; second, J. H. Carter, died February 24, 1863, near Monticello, Ky., of brain fever; third, Benj. H. Jones; fourth, F. M. Cottman. Privates—J. H. Adams, discharged December 1, 1862, disability; J. N. Aldridge, died in Camp Douglas, October 21, 1864, of typhoid fever; Lewis Ballard, George Birch, Aaron Blythe, Henry Charles, R. H. Chisholm, David Clark, D. W. Clark, Wildie Clark, Wm. Clem, William Craig, John Daniel, F. M. Dority, John Dority, Samuel Dority, Wm. Dority, John Dougherty, died in Camp Douglas, October 2, 1864, of pneumonia; Charles B. Ecton, now a member of the Kentucky Senate; Casswell Epperson, John Fields, Wm. French, John Goode, John Gruelle, deserted October, 1862, and joined the Federal Army; Michael Haggard, Robert Hogan, Joe S. Hood, Henry Hugeley, James Hugeley, John Jones, Robert Knox, died in Camp Douglas, Octob
hn Jarvis, 1835; William Dickson, 1836; Levi Ingalls, 1837; Henry Whittemore, 1837; Eleazer Homer, 1837, Jr. 1838; Washington J Lane, 1837, 1846, 1847; Abijah Frost, 1838, 1842, 1849-1852, 1854, 1857; George C. Russell, 1838; Timothy Eaton, 1839; Isaiah Jenkins, 1839, 1840; George Prentiss, 1839; Chester Sanderson, 1840; Joseph Hill, 1840, 1842, 1849, 1854; Abbot Allen, 1840; Josiah H. Russell, 1841, 1818, 1854, 185; Adonijah Barnes, 1841; Ebenezer Hovey, 1842; Stephen Symmes, 1842, 1843; David Clark, 1843, 1844, 1856; Joel F. Hanson, 1843, 1816, 1850; William L. Clark, 1843, 1860, 1852; Thaddeus Frost, 1844, 1845; Abner P. Wyman, 1844; Joseph Wyman, 1844; Daniel Clark, 1845, 1846; Abel Peirce, 1845, 1846, 1849; Samuel C. Bucknam, 1845, 1849; James S. Russell, 1847; Henry Frost, 1847, 1853, 1855; Matthew Griswold, 1847; Gershom Cutter, 1848; Warren Frost, 1848; Stephen Symmes, Jr., 1848; George Stearns, 1850; Jacob Hutchinson, 1850; Abner Gardner, 1850, 1854; Thomas J. Russell, 1851;
. Kimball Farmer, 1832-34. David Dodge, 1835-41. Benjamin Hill, 1835-37. Mansur W. Marsh, 1839-41, 1843. Charles Muzzey, 1839-41. Daniel Cady, 1843. Abbot Allen, 1844. Thomas P. Peirce, 1844, 1845, 1848. Silas Frost, 1844, 1845. William Dickson, 1845, 1846, 1850-60 (resigned). Isaiah Jenkins, 1846. Daniel Clark, 1847. Edwin Locke, 1847. Davis Locke, 1847. Washington J. Lane, 1848, 1851, 1852, 1854, 1857-63. Joseph O. Wellington, 1848, 1849, 1855. David Clark, 1849, 1850. Albert Winn, 1849, 1866, 1867. Stephen Symmes, Jr., 1860-67. George A. Locke, 1853. George C. Russell, 1856, 1864, 1865. Samuel S. Davis, 1860-63. David Crosby, 1864. George Y. Wellington, 1865, 1866. Abel R. Proctor, 1867. Town Clerks. Thomas Russell, Jr., 1807-25 (1826—excused). Timothy Wellington, 1826-34. Henry Whittemore, 1835 (excused). Isaac Shattuck, Jr., 1835-38. Benjamin Poland, 1839-42. William Whittemore, Jr. . 1843-45 (resigned
Persevering thieves. --Two attempts were made last Monday night to enter the premises of Mr. David Clark, living on 9th street, beyond Leigh; but, owing to the timely waking of Mr. C., who immediately pursued them, they did not succeed in their nefarious designs.--Any further attempts made by chicken thieves or other night prowlers to patronize, in their depredatory excursions, the peaceful residents of that section of the city known as French Garden Hill, will meet with a liberal discharge of buckshot and ball.
nk we shall remain here long. The enemy is crossing Ganley in large numbers, at Ganley Bridge and Carnitax's Ferry, below us, and at Hughes' Ferry, above us — their purpose doubtless being to take us both in our front and rear. This movement will probably necessitate our falling back fifteen miles farther, to Meadow Bluff, beyond which point the enemy cannot flank us. If they fight us at either place we shall whip them, unless their numbers double ours. We have now the addition of Colonel Clark's North Carolina, and Col. Ector's Georgia regiments, two as fine bodies of men, and commanded by as brave and efficient officers, as are in the service. They are greatly chagrined at not being able to reach us in time for our fight at Ganley, and when the tug of another battle comes, they will not dishonor their gallant States, whose sons they are, or the glorious cause they represent upon the field. These Colonels both fought through the Mexican war, the former having been wounded si
Losses in the 2d co. Howitzers. Camp 2d Co Howitzers, May 13th, 1864. To the Editor of the Dispatch: Our battalion (Watson's) lost all its field officers, either killed or wounded. Col Brown, killed, (before reported; Lt Col Hardaway, severely wounded; Major David Watson, mortally wounded. Up to this time seven privates in this company are wounded, but none killed, viz: C L Christian, severely; Jno Ellet, severely; David Clark, mortally; Jos Cocke, severely; --Trent, severely; H M Burnly, slightly; Geo Mordecai, slightly. These casualties all look place during the fight on Thursday.