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Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 25 3 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 4, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 27, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 2 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 1 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Organization of the two governments. (search)
ettus (1860-2) Governor Charles Clarke (1863) Governor Jacob Thompson (1863-4) North Carolina Governor John W. Ellis (1859-61) Governor H. T. Clark, acting (1861-2) Governor Zebulon B. Vance (1862-5) South Carolina Governor Francis W. Pickens (1860-2) Governor M. L. Bonham (1862-4) Governor A. G. Magrath (1864-5) Tennessee Governor Isham G. Harris (1857-65) Union military Governor Governor Andrew Johnson, (1862-5) Texas Governor Samuel Houston (1859-61) Governor Edward Clark, acting (1861) Governor Francis R. Lubbock 1861-3) Governor Pendleton Murrah (1863-5) Virginia Governor John Letcher (1860-4) Governor William Smith, (1864-5) Border States Kentucky Governor Beriah Magoffin (1859-62) Governor James F. Robinson (1862-3) Governor Thomas E. Bramlette (1863-7) Maryland Governor Thomas H. Hicks (1857-61) Governor A. W. Bradford (1861-5) Missouri Governor C. F. Jackson (1861) Union
led, leaving behind, with other trophies, their hats and coats, which showed that the owners were officers. In the pockets of the latter were several letters just finished, giving a complete account of the late advance of 2,800 men from Yorktown to attack Newport News. One of an amusing character from the pocket of James Steele, bookseller, Richmond, describes the federal troops as a set of baboons, to be speedily driven from the sacred soil of Virginia.--N. Y. Evening Post, July 3. Edward Clark, the Governor of Texas, issued a proclamation, in which he said: It will also be treasonable for any citizen of Texas to pay any debts now owing by him to a citizen of either of the States or Territories now at war with the Confederate States of America. --National Intelligencer, July 3. Fifty Home Guards under Captain Cook, from De Soto and Hopewell, Mo., proceeded last night by rail to Irondale, where they arrived this morning at 9 o'clock, and marched towards Farmington in search
Doc. 112.-proclamation of Edward Clark, Governor of the State of Texas. Whereas, There is now a condition of actual hostility between the Government of the United States and the Confederate States of America, and, whereas, the Congress of the latter Government have recognized the existence of war with the United States, exce, I have received information that some of the citizens of Texas have already violated their duty in the premises, as good citizens: Now, therefore, I, Edward Clark, Governor of the State of Texas, do issue this my proclamation to the people of said State, notifying them that all communication of whatsoever character betwehereof, I have hereunto signed my name, and caused the great seal of the State to be affixed, at the city of Austin, this the eighth day of June, A. D. 1861, and in the year of the independence of Texas the twenty-sixth, and of the Confederate States the first. By the Governor, Edward Clark. Bird Holland, Secretary of State.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Singer, Isaac Merritt 1811-1875 (search)
Singer, Isaac Merritt 1811-1875 Inventor; born in Oswego, N. Y., Oct. 27, 1811; learned the machinist's trade; devoted himself to improving sewing-machines; invented a single-thread, chain-stitch machine, for the manufacture of which he built a factory in New York (with Edward Clark, a wealthy lawyer). He was sued by the Howe Sewing-machine Company for infringing upon the patents of Elias Howe while the latter was absent in England in 1847-49. After much litigation, in which some of the most prominent lawyers of the United States were employed, the priority of Howe's invention was established and a compromise was effected in 1854. Singer died in Torquay, England, July 23, 1875.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), State of Texas, (search)
s, in this volume. Presidents of republic. Samuel HoustoninauguratedOct. 22, 1836 M. B. LamarinauguratedDec. 10, 1838 Dr. Anson JonesinauguratedDec. 9, 1841 Samuel HoustoninauguratedDec. 13, 1841 State governors. J. P. Hendersonassumes officeFeb. 19, 1846 George T. Woodassumes officeDec. 21, 1847 P. Hansboro Bellassumes officeDec., 1849 E. M. Peaseassumes office1853 State governors—Continued. H. R. Runnelsassumes officeDec., 1857 Samuel Houstonassumes officeDec., 1859 Edward Clarkassumes officeMarch 20, 1861 F. R. Lubbockassumes officeDec., 1861 P. Hurrahassumes officeDec., 1863 A. J. Hamiltonassumes officeJuly 21, 1865 J. W. Throckmortonassumes officeAug. 13, 1866 E. M. Peaseassumes officeJuly 30, 1867 E. J. Davisassumes officeJan., 1870 Richard Cokeassumes officeJan., 1874 R. B. Hubbardassumes officeJan., 1877 Oran M. Robertsassumes officeJan., 1879 John Irelandassumes officeJan., 1883 Lawrence S. Rossassumes officeJan., 1887 James S. Hoggassumes offi
861.Promoted Brigadier-General. Col. John Gregg Promoted Brigadier-General. 8thTexasRegimentInfantryCol. W. H. YoungMay 13, 1862.Promoted Brigadier-General. 9thTexasRegimentInfantryCol. E. B. Nichols   10thTexasRegimentInfantryCol. Roger Q. MillsSept. 12, 1862.  Col. Allison Nelson Promoted Brigadier-General. 11thTexasRegimentInfantryCol. O. M. RobertsJune 23, 1862.  12thTexasRegimentInfantryCol. Overton Young   13thTexasRegimentInfantryCol. J. Bates   14thTexasRegimentInfantryCol. Edward Clark   15thTexasRegimentInfantryCol. J. W. SpeightApril 16, 1862.  16thTexasRegimentInfantryCol. George Flournoy   17thTexasRegimentInfantryCol. R. T. P. AllenJune 9, 1862.  18thTexasRegimentInfantryCol. David CulbersonFeb. 23, 1863.  Col. W. B. Ochiltree   19thTexasRegimentInfantryCol. Richard WaterhouseMay 12, 1862.Promoted Brigadier-General. 20thTexasRegimentInfantryCol. H. M. Eimore   21stTexasRegimentInfantryCol. W. H. Griffin   22dTexasRegimentInfantryCol. R.
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.), Governors of states wholly or in part in sympathy with the Confederate struggle for independence. (search)
occupied by the Federal Army, Mr. Caruthers was never inaugurated, and Governor Harris held over, under the law, until the close of the war. Mr. Caruthers had been a member of the Provisional Congress of the Confederate States. His ExcellencyEdward ClarkTexasGovernor in 1861. Governor Sam. Houston was deposed in 1861, and was succeeded by Governor Clark. His ExcellencyF. R. LubbockTexasGovernor from August, 1861, to August, 1863; had been A. D. C. to the President, with rank of Colonel. His Governor Clark. His ExcellencyF. R. LubbockTexasGovernor from August, 1861, to August, 1863; had been A. D. C. to the President, with rank of Colonel. His ExcellencyPendleton MurrahTexasGovernor from August, 1863, to the close of the war. His ExcellencyJohn LetcherVirginiaGovernor from January, 1860, to January, 1864. His ExcellencyWilliam SmithVirginiaGovernor from January, 1864, to the close of the war; previous to election as Governor, had served in the Confederate army as Colonel, Brigadier-General and Major-General.
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2, Index of names of persons. (search)
, W. R., 258 Clark, A. L., 462 Clark, A. W., 379 Clark, C. A., 486 Clark, C. E., 30 Clark, C. P., 30 Clark, C. W., 581 Clark, Chester, 258 Clark, D. C., 259 Clark, D. H., 258 Clark, D. S., 30 Clark, E. A. M., 581 Clark, E. C., 258 Clark, E. L., 258 Clark, E. L., 393 Clark, E. M., 30 Clark, E. P., 379 Clark, E. R., 258, 407 Clark, E. S., 209 Clark, E. W., 393, 639 Clark, Endora, 601, 639 Clark, G. W., 258, 379 Clark, H. E. W., 258 Clark, H. L., 258 Clark, Harry, 258 ClarkClark, E. L., 393 Clark, E. M., 30 Clark, E. P., 379 Clark, E. R., 258, 407 Clark, E. S., 209 Clark, E. W., 393, 639 Clark, Endora, 601, 639 Clark, G. W., 258, 379 Clark, H. E. W., 258 Clark, H. L., 258 Clark, Harry, 258 Clark, J. F., 581 Clark, J. H., 30 Clark, J. H., 258 Clark, J. P., 581 Clark, J. S., 30 Clark, J. S., 258 Clark, J. W., 30 Clark, J. W., 258 Clark, John, 258 Clark, John, 407 Clark, Johnson, 379 Clark, L. A., 258 Clark, L. E., 258 Clark, Leach, 258 Clark, O. R., 576 Clark, R. F., 258 Clark, R. M., 258 Clark, R. R., 379 Clark, Robert, 30 Clark, Simeon, 30 Clark, Solomon, 258 Clark, T. C., 259 Clark, T. W., 407 Clark, T. W., 462 Clark, W. A., 250 Clark, W. B., 462 Clark, W. F
tion and ordinances of the convention; therefore be it ordained, that the office of governor is vacant, and that Lieut.-Gov. Edward Clark is hereby required and authorized to exercise the powers and authority appertaining to the office of governor uns successor the archives and great seal of state, and other property belonging to the department of state. Next week Governor Clark entered the governor's office and General Houston retired from it, and thenceforward Governor Clark was recognized byGovernor Clark was recognized by the legislature, the officers and people of the State as the governor, to the end of his term. In a few days there appeared in the newspapers a letter from General Houston, Addressed to the People of Texas, Executive Department, March 16, 1861 (t held rank as follows: John Gregg, Thomas Green, John A. Wharton, Henry E. McCulloch, brigadier-generals; R. Q. Mills, Edward Clark, C. M. Winkler, Geo. Baylor, Geo. Flournoy, John R. Baylor, colonels; Wm. Bird, lieutenant-colonel; D. M. Pendergast,
neral. Other preliminary dispositions to prepare Texas for a crisis were now rapidly made. On the 11th of April Gov. Edward Clark was formally notified by the Confederate government that Colonel Van Dorn was in Texas to organize troops for the a and became a part of Geo. W. Baylor's regiment in the Arizona campaign. Col. Wm. C. Young, under the appointment of Governor Clark, raised a cavalry regiment for the protection of our northern frontier on Red river. He crossed the river and capturntier posts. Thus the people and the State government were free to make arrangements for raising troops for the war. Governor Clark, therefore, on the 8th of June issued his proclamation announcing that a state of war existed. The legislature having made such provision as was then thought necessary, adjourned sine die, on the 9th of April, leaving Governor Clark and other officers to carry on the State government, and to co-operate with the authorities of the Confederate government in milita
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