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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 67 (search)
th day of July, in accordance with orders received, the Fifty-ninth charged across the open field on the left of the railroad, driving the enemy from his rifle-pits, and permanently held them, with a loss of 4 killed and 16 wounded, including Adjutant Clark and Lieutenant Korhammer, of Company I, who was shot through the body while gallantly leading forward the skirmish line. The day was extremely hot and the men suffered dreadfully from thirst and exposure to the sweltering sun on that open firts to dislodge the enemy, they have at all times shown the highest qualities as soldiers and merit the thanks of their fellow-countrymen. All the officers faithfully and intelligently executed my orders. From Lieutenant-Colonel Hale and Adjutant Clark I ever received prompt and reliable support. The soldierly bearing of Capt. D. W. Henderson, so conspicuously displayed on many of the battle-fields in which the regiment has been engaged throughout the several skirmishes and affairs of this
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 68 (search)
which we had occupied on the night of the 1st instant. This night's march was peculiarly difficult, owing to the darkness and muddy condition of the roads. On the 6th we remained in bivouac. The 7th and 8th instant were occupied in the march to Atlanta. On the afternoon of the 8th instant we made our camp in the position which we now occupy, three miles east of Atlanta. During the time that I was honored with the command of the regiment, I received hearty co-operation from all its officers; the conduct of the men was all that could be desired. To Adjutant Frank Clark I am much indebted for the prompt and efficient manner in which he executed the duties of his office, and otherwise aided me in the command. I append a list of casualties. Nominal list (omitted) shows 6 men wounded. I have the honor to be, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Samuel West, Captain, Commanding Regiment. Capt. John Crowell, Jr., Assistant Adjutant-General, Second Brigade.
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., chapter 51 (search)
ommodore Read. Acting-Master, G. E. Hill; Acting-Assistant-Surgeon, James Wilson; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, J. J. Duffield; Acting-Ensigns, G. E. McConnell, C. Ainsworth and L. Wold; Acting-Master's Mates, Guy Morrison, E. K. Howland and G. A. Patchke; Engineers: Acting-First-Assistant, A. K. Gaul; Acting-Third-Assistants, John Westinghouse, Wesley J. Phillips and George Smith. Steamer Currituck. Acting-Master, W. H. Smith; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, Henry Johnson; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, Frank Clark; Acting-Ensigns, Thomas Nelson, Ambrose Felix and J. A. Havens; Acting-Master's Mate, G. B. Hall; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistant, Alfred Clum; Acting-Third-Assistants, O. P. Thompson and C. B. Wright. Steamer Jacob Bell. Acting-Master, G. C. Shultze; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, Wm. Neilson, Jr.; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, Samuel Anderson; Acting-Ensigns, Benjamin Walker and D. W. Hodson; Acting-Master's Mates, Robert L. Omensetter and Arthur Clegg; Engineers: Acting
(wounded and missing at Boonesboro Gap;) Colonel Alfred Cumming, of the Tenth Georgia; Major Tracy, badly, and Captain Watson, of the Sixth Georgia; Lieutenant-Colonel Sloan, of the Fifty-third Georgia; Colonel Jones, of the Twenty-second Georgia; Lieutenant-Colonel Crowder, badly, of the Thirty-first Georgia; Major Lewis, Captains Harney and St. Martin, and Lieutenants Murphy, Cook, Current, Dea, Montgomery, Bryant, Wren, Birdsall, and McJimsey, of the Eighth Louisiana; Colonel Penn, Captains Frank Clark and O'Connor, and Lieutenants Smith, Orr and Martin, of the Sixth Louisiana; Captains Herrin, Morgan and Harper, and Lieutenants Knox, Tarpey, Flower, Talbot, and Wells, of the Seventh Louisiana; Major Menger, Captain Hart and Lieut. Patterson, of the Fifth Louisiana; Colonel Hately, Lieutenant-Colonel T. B. Lamar, Sergeant-Major Anderson, of the Fifth Florida; Captain Gregory, and privates Hagin, Henry, Bryant, Parker, Strickland, Bateman, Yon, Barnett, Dillard and Martin, of company
(wounded and missing at Boonesboro Gap;) Colonel Alfred Cumming, of the Tenth Georgia; Major Tracy, badly, and Captain Watson, of the Sixth Georgia; Lieutenant-Colonel Sloan, of the Fifty-third Georgia; Colonel Jones, of the Twenty-second Georgia; Lieutenant-Colonel Crowder, badly, of the Thirty-first Georgia; Major Lewis, Captains Harney and St. Martin, and Lieutenants Murphy, Cook, Current, Dea, Montgomery, Bryant, Wren, Birdsall, and McJimsey, of the Eighth Louisiana; Colonel Penn, Captains Frank Clark and O'Connor, and Lieutenants Smith, Orr and Martin, of the Sixth Louisiana; Captains Herrin, Morgan and Harper, and Lieutenants Knox, Tarpey, Flower, Talbot, and Wells, of the Seventh Louisiana; Major Menger, Captain Hart and Lieut. Patterson, of the Fifth Louisiana; Colonel Hately, Lieutenant-Colonel T. B. Lamar, Sergeant-Major Anderson, of the Fifth Florida; Captain Gregory, and privates Hagin, Henry, Bryant, Parker, Strickland, Bateman, Yon, Barnett, Dillard and Martin, of company
the cheerful and soldier-like manner in which these hardships and privations were endured by the troops throughout. History will record, and the country reward, their deeds. My staff, consisting of T. W. Morrison, acting Assistant Adjutant-General; Captain H. Pease, Inspector-General; Captain McCullough, Lieutenants Frank E. Reynolds, and Thomas H. Dailey, Aids-de-Camp; Surgeon J. L. Judd, Medical Director; Captain Shriver, Ordnance Officer; Lieutenant R. Plunket, Provost Marshal; private Frank Clark, Clerk to the Assistant Adjutant General, and acting Aid-de-Camp; deported themselves throughout the entire campaign, as well as on the battle-field, with distinguished zeal and conspicuous gallantry. While expressing my high regard and approbation of the General commanding, I desire to tender my thanks to yourself, Major, and to Colonel Langdon, Major Bates, Captains Thurston, Williams, and Fisher, of his staff, for the prompt and efficient manner in which the field duties were pe
on the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad." The passenger express train bound West on the 3d instant was thrown into the Platte river in consequence of the timbers of the east end of the bridge having been burnt away. The entire train went down, the engine turning over, and the baggage, freight, mail and two passenger cars being piled on top. The passenger cars were completely smashed, and the baggage-master is the only one of the train who escaped unhurt. Conductor Coulter and Frank Clark, the engineer, both died in a few minutes from their injuries, and Martin Field, mail agent, and Chas. Moore, fireman, and F. Fox, brakeman, were instantly killed. Among the wounded were Mr. Medill, son of Dr. Medill, of Ohio, and his wife, both badly injured. A Comment on Fremont's proclamation. The New York Day Book continues to speak out quite boldly, despite the efforts at suppression. The following is from that paper of Sept. 6: * * This is too obvious to be disputed
The Daily Dispatch: October 26, 1861., [Electronic resource], By the Governor of Virginia.--a Proclamation. (search)
how many failed in the attempted. Those who were left on the shore then put down their arms and surrendered, and this terminated the battle. We have the following list of causalities in the 18th Mississippi regiment. Killed--Hon. John I Cooper, a volunteer private in the Beauregard Rifles--formerly a member of the Mississippi Legislature Jack Pettus private in the Burt Rifles — son of Gov. Pettus, of Mississippi. --Col. Burt, badly, in the thigh; Gerald Wilson, slightly. Frank Clark, ( nephew of Mr. Cooper,) mortally;--Short, slightly, John Devind, wounded in the head not mortally; North Saunders, in the leg, Capt. K. P. Hill of the Camden Rifles brother of Gen. D. H. Hill, of North Carolina and member of the Mississippi Secession Convention,) slightly in the arm; and Willis Haddox, slightly. The entire causalities upon our side may be considered definitely ascertained, since a dispatch was received yesterday by President Davis from Gen. Beauregard, based on a r
The Daily Dispatch: October 26, 1861., [Electronic resource], By the Governor of Virginia.--a Proclamation. (search)
into the support of the Government, for it is the first duty of every one to make everything bend to the establishment of our national prosperity. Roanoke 18land. The following paragraph is taken from the Raleigh (N. C.) Standard, of the 23d: This is an important strategic point for the protection of the region bordering upon Albemarle Sound, and to check any rear movement of the enemy against Norfolk. It is therefore of great importance that the eyes of President Davis and Gov. Clark should be directed to that point. The intimations from the North are strong that the enemy will soon attempt to assail Roanoke Island with a strong force from Hatteras, under Gen. Mansileid, an experienced officer. Have we an experienced officer in command at that point? Have we a sufficient army and naval force there to resist the invader successfully? There is perhaps, greater danger at that point than at any other, if Hatteras is to be made the base of operations by the enemy. We b
The Daily Dispatch: October 29, 1861., [Electronic resource], Vice President Stephens and the hospitals. (search)
dy J. Smith, do; Edward Myers, slightly; Wm. Radcliffe, do; D. B. Rucker, do; H. E. Pope, do; M. R. Campbell, do; J. R. Gray, do; S. D. Burns, do; C. Cherry, do; J. R. Knight, do; L. McLarru, do; Capt. J. M. Jayne, do; Lieut. W. P. Maxy, do; Sergeant Edward Myers, do. Total--3 killed and 25 wounded. Company B, Capt. W. H. Luce. Killed--Private Wm. Hanson. Wounded--Private H. H. Fowler, slightly. Total — I killed, 1 wounded. Company C, Capt. O. R. Singleton. Killed--Private Frank Clark. Wounded--Private John Devine, seriously; N. H. Saunders, slightly; Willis Haddox, slightly; Geo. C. Short, slightly. Total--1 killed and 4 wounded. Company D, Capt. C. F. Hamer. Killed--Capt. F. W. Mobley, W. E. Carol. Wounded--Lt. F. Bostick, seriously; Privates Arthur Gary, slightly; James M. Kincaird, seriously; John T. Morris, mortally. (since died;) Patrick McNeelees, mortally; J. S. Riley, do.; Jas. Rosson, do.; Thos. Wilson, do., (leg amputated;) Joel Wolfe, sligh