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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
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ther bayou packet, was taken on the twenty-sixth, and, under direction of Major Leon Smith, fitted up as a gunboat as well as it could be done in the brief time. Bulwarks of cotton-bales were built up also on her guards, and she had much the appearance, when she left here, of a well-loaded cotton-boat, taking her cargo down to Galveston for shipment. She was armed with two howitzer guns, and commander by Captain W. H. Sangster. Captain Herby, of the C. S. Navy, commanded her guns; Lieutenant Harvey Clark being second in command, and Colonel Bagby, of the Seventh cavalry, commanded the detail of his men who were on board as sharp-shooters. The men were detailed from the Sibley brigade; all the brigade having stepped forward on a call for volunteers, and being anxious to take part in the affair. Beside these, there were several volunteers from among our citizens. The full number of men was about one hundred and fifty. The Neptune left here the morning of the same day with the Bayo
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
States in 1860, stationed at Galveston; but when his native State seceded he resigned his commission and entered the Confederate States service as captain of heavy artillery, remaining as such until after the battle of Sabine Pass, when he was made commodore in command of the fleet at that place. In the battle of Galveston, January 1, 1863, he, being then seventy years of age, commanded the guns on the Neptune. In that engagement he lost eight men out of fifteen, and had his lieutenant, Harvey Clark, killed at his side. During the fight his vessel, a converted river boat, was sunk, and he was the last to leave the ship. The end of the war found Captain Harby in command of the harbor of Galveston, in which city he continued to reside up to the time of his death, which occurred on December 3, 1870, having neither asked nor received a pardon from the government which he had served for forty-eight years. Captain Harby married, in 1842, Miss Leonora R., daughter of Judge L. S. DeLyon, o