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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Historical sketch of the Rockbridge artillery, C. S. Army, by a member of the famous battery. (search)
13th July, we marched to Winchester, and encamped northeast of the town, our battery in an apple orchard and the rest of our brigade near. Here, on the 14th, there joined us Richard C. M. Page; on the 15th, John J. Williams; on the 16th, James Gregory Clark; on the 17th, James M. Garnett, and George R. Bedinger, transferred from Second Virginia infantry, which he had joined the 15th of May at Harper's Ferry. We had now several young men from Winchester in the battery, and this fact led to appointed hospital steward, October 1, 1862. The following members of the company were discharged at the dates opposite their names for ill-health or for other causes, by orders of the generals in command: J. Gibson Clark, October 5th; J. Gregory Clark, July 13th; George W. Conner, July 11th; John M. Goul, July 13th; Ferd. Hetterick, August 13th; James Rutherford Houston, July 25th; William Hughes, July 22d; L. S. Macon, July 31 (elected sheriff); O. M. Marshall, August 1st; Thompson B. M
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.24 (search)
eir guard, they rushed to their guns which were concealed about their beds, and opened fire on them. The result was that Clark, a son of General Clark, of Caldwell county, and Henley, from the same county, were killed. The others escaped, leaving General Clark, of Caldwell county, and Henley, from the same county, were killed. The others escaped, leaving the bodies of Clark and Henley. Being encouraged by the failure to dislodge them, they began to enlarge the territory which they were to plunder. About a week previous to this Simmons with his band had crossed into Alexander county, and had madeClark and Henley. Being encouraged by the failure to dislodge them, they began to enlarge the territory which they were to plunder. About a week previous to this Simmons with his band had crossed into Alexander county, and had made a raid on Colonel McCurdy, a well-to-do planter. About this time Mr. W. C. Green, of Alexander county, who had been a lieutenant in the Confederate army, received news from a friend in Wilkes county that Wade had planned to move into Alexander course and practice of the courts. They were informed that they would be disposed of as summarily as they had disposed of Clark, Henley, Brown, and Linney. Stakes were put up, and on the way to the place of execution they were given time to pray.