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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The confederate left at Fredericksburg. (search)
ry fire from Cobb's brigade, so thinned their ranks that the line retreated without advancing, leaving their guidons planted. Soon another force, heavier than the first, advanced, and were driven back with great slaughter. They were met on retiring by reenforcements, and advanced again, but were again repulsed, with great loss. This continued until about 1 P. M., when General Cobb reported to me that he was short of ammunition. I sent his own very intelligent and brave courier, little Johnny Clark, from Augusta, Georgia, to bring up his ordnance supplies, and directed General Kershaw to reinforce General Cobb with two of his South Carolina regiments, and I also sent the 16th Georgia, which had been detached, to report to General Cobb. A few minutes after these orders had been given I received a note from General Cobb, informing me that General R. H. Anderson, whose division was posted on the left and rear of Cobb's, had just told him that if the attack was turned on him he would r
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 8: (search)
zed body was permitted to approach. In spite of these terrible reverses, a fifth and a sixth charge were made before night came to end the terrible slaughter. The musketry alone killed and wounded about 5,000, to which the artillery added enough to make 7,000 maimed, dead and dying, lying on that horrible field of destruction. General McLaws has written that about 1 p. m. General Cobb reported that he was short of ammunition. I sent his own very intelligent and brave courier, little Johnny Clark, from Augusta, Ga., to bring up his ordnance supplies, and directed General Kershaw to reinforce General Cobb with two of his South Carolina regiments, and I also sent the Sixteenth Georgia, which had been detached, to report to General Cobb. General McLaws also tells how a Georgia boy, William Crumley, an orderly of General Kershaw, seeing his chief's horse in a very dangerous position, rode the animal up a slope, exposed to the hottest fire of the enemy, left him in a safe place, and r