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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 3: Berkshire County. (search)
530. Valuation in 1860, $107,505; in 1865, $133,234. The selectmen in 1861 were Dennis Thayer, James Mixer, Hiram Brown; in 1862, Waterman Brown, John Page, Joseph Miner; in 1863, Waterman Brown, Joseph Miner, Hiram Brown; in 1864, Joseph D. Clark, Ezra W. Gleason, Joseph Miner, Jr.; in 1865, Richard Shattuck, Laban Clark, Henry Worthy. The town-clerk in 1861, 1862, and 1863, was Waterman Brown; in 1864, William W. Gallup; in 1865, Charles W. Briggs. The town-treasurer in 1861 was Joseph Clark; in 1862 and 1863, Joseph B. Wheeler; in 1864, Waterman Brown; in 1865, Eleazer Ketchum. 1861. No action appears to have been taken by the town, in its corporate capacity, in relation to the war during this year. 1862. The first meeting to act upon war matters was held on the 22d of July; at which five hundred dollars were appropriated to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each of five men who would enlist in the military service for three years, to fill the quota of the town.
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestry.—1764-1805. (search)
elf, but of many of my Neighbours; I thank God I have a Competency at present, but the times forbode greater distress ahead. I have in the Conclusion settled my Business here and am now about to remove. I lately rec'd a kind letter from Sally Clark That is, his younger sister Sarah, who married Joseph Clark. which merits my thanks and well wishes towards her. I shall Endeavour to write to her before I leave this Place if Possible. Silas His younger brother. Slow as Uncle Silas was aJoseph Clark. which merits my thanks and well wishes towards her. I shall Endeavour to write to her before I leave this Place if Possible. Silas His younger brother. Slow as Uncle Silas was a proverb at Jemseg. and doubtless applied to correspondence as well as to other things.I'm afraid has forgot me. William His youngest brother, a cripple from birth, but a very intelligent schoolmaster. has wrote very kindly whom I shall answer the first opp'ty. It wou'd give me infinite Satisfaction when you write if you wou'd Cast off the formal method of arranging your letters and write more of the Particular Circumstances attending your welfare; how you get along thro this troublesom Wor
Thomas Foxcroft 30 Jan. 1727-8, and removed to Sudbury and afterwards to Menot., where he d. 28 May 1761, a. 75; his w. Martha d. 18 Nov. 1752. 9. Abraham, s. of Jacob (4), m. Prudence, dau. of Nathaniel Hancock, 18 Dec. 1718, and had Abraham, b. 27 Sept. 1719, grad. H. C. 1737, settled in the ministry at Shutesbury 1742, became obnoxious to the Sons of Liberty on account of his political sentiments, and was dismissed in 1778; he d. in Oxford 8 June 1788; Prudence, b. 13 Aug. 1721, m. Joseph Clark 27 Mar. 1741; Mary, b. 11 Nov. 1722, m. William Codner, 25 Dec. 1745; Abigail, bap. 23 Aug. 1724, m. Rev. Stephen Badger 20 Sept. 1753; Elizabeth, bap. 4 Sept. 1726, d. young; Elizabeth, bap. 26 Nov. 1727, m. Benjamin Eustis 11 May 1749, and d. 30 May 1775 (she was mother of Gov. William Eustis who was b. here 10 June 1753); Aaron, bap 3 May 1730; Martha, bap. 28 Nov. 1731, m. William Bell 9 Aug. 1767; Sarah, bap. 7 Oct. 1733, m. Rev. Nathan Fiske of Brookfield 19 Oct. 1758; Tabitha, bap.
Thomas Foxcroft 30 Jan. 1727-8, and removed to Sudbury and afterwards to Menot., where he d. 28 May 1761, a. 75; his w. Martha d. 18 Nov. 1752. 9. Abraham, s. of Jacob (4), m. Prudence, dau. of Nathaniel Hancock, 18 Dec. 1718, and had Abraham, b. 27 Sept. 1719, grad. H. C. 1737, settled in the ministry at Shutesbury 1742, became obnoxious to the Sons of Liberty on account of his political sentiments, and was dismissed in 1778; he d. in Oxford 8 June 1788; Prudence, b. 13 Aug. 1721, m. Joseph Clark 27 Mar. 1741; Mary, b. 11 Nov. 1722, m. William Codner, 25 Dec. 1745; Abigail, bap. 23 Aug. 1724, m. Rev. Stephen Badger 20 Sept. 1753; Elizabeth, bap. 4 Sept. 1726, d. young; Elizabeth, bap. 26 Nov. 1727, m. Benjamin Eustis 11 May 1749, and d. 30 May 1775 (she was mother of Gov. William Eustis who was b. here 10 June 1753); Aaron, bap 3 May 1730; Martha, bap. 28 Nov. 1731, m. William Bell 9 Aug. 1767; Sarah, bap. 7 Oct. 1733, m. Rev. Nathan Fiske of Brookfield 19 Oct. 1758; Tabitha, bap.
a family by the name of Pritchard living there, but they did not remain very long. The three remaining houses to be spoken of are clearer to my memory than any of the others. The house occupied by David Sanborn, father of David Sanborn who resides on Prospect street, stands near Union square. Adjoining this is the one then occupied by ‘Grandma’ Bonner, sister of the elder Mrs. Sanborn, and mother of William Bonner, who moved his house up the hill. In the third house, just east of the Prospect Hill schoolhouse, my father, Joseph Clark, lived. These three houses are in possession of the original families, the descendants of two of them (Mrs. Bonner's and my father's) occupying them. Although the years have not passed by without leaving their marks on them, and the lovely, old-fashioned flower gardens belonging to them have long since gone, they wear a natural, old-time look, and stand as landmarks to those who were familiar with Somerville when it was set off from Charlesto
ntury15, 32 Charlestown Schools in the 18th Century58 Charlestown, Separation of15 Charter Street Burying-Ground40 Cheever, Elizabeth20 Cheever, Ezekiel, Schoolmaster, 166119, 20, 21, 32, 37, 39 Cheever, Ezekiel, Death of20 Chelmsford, Mass.19, 53, 54, 56 Chelsea, Mass.42, 66 Chester Ave., Somerville42, 45 Chesthunt leyes, England19 Christian Examiner, The3, 89 Christian Messenger, The27 Christian Souvenir, The3 Christ's Hospital School, England20 Clay Pits, The, Somerville44 Clark, Joseph47 College Hill26 Committee on Historic Sites, Somerville Historical Society74 Committee of Safety, The89, 90, 92 Concord Bridge78 Concord Fight, The80 Concord, Mass.52, 88 Concord, N. H.50, 51, 52, 56, 57 Concord R. R.51 Concord River52, 53, 54, 55 Condit, Sears42 Coney, John27 Connecticut Flag, The80, 87, 93 Connecticut River49, 52 Connecticut, 3rd Regiment of86 Continental Army, The86 Continental Congress, The95 Coos Falls50 Corpus Christi, Cambridge, England16 C
Historic leaves, volume 4, April, 1905 - January, 1906, Neighborhood Sketch number 8
Washington
and
Prospect streets
(search)
e old Engine house, situated corner of Washington and Prospects streets, opposite my house, where I think the first Unitarian society first worshipped. Next to me, easterly, was the residence of Mr. Clark Bennett, who at that time was prominent in town matters; beyond me, next easterly, was what was called the Yellow Block, in which resided Nathan Fellows, who sold fish out of a wagon; next easterly was Ives till; next, James Underwood. Opposite my house, on Washington street, resided Joseph Clark (no relation of mine); next westerly, William Bonner (on the site of Prospect-hill schoolhouse), next westerly, Miss Eliza Bonner, afterward Mrs. Augustus Hitchings; next westerly, David Sanborn. Adjoining my estate were the residences of Benjamin F. Ricker and John (B.) Giles, on Somerville avenue. All of my neighbors that I have mentioned lived to a good old age, and have long since departed and joined the silent majority. At the time I refer to there was no public conveyance to B
9, 92. Charlestown Neck, 4. Charlestown Schools after 1793, 38-46. Charlestown Schools after 1812, 63-74. Charlestown Schools from 1819-20, 90-101. Charlestown Schools without the Peninsula, 14-22. Chapman, Jonathan, 41. Chapman, Richard, 41. Charter of William and Mary, 79. Chauncy, President, 79. Chelmsford, Mass., 87. Chelsea, Mass., 38, 77. Chelsea Point, 100. Chicago, Ill., 8. Christ Church, Cambridge, Mass., 85. City Square, Charlestown, Mass., 65, 78. Clark, Joseph, 47. Clark, Joseph H., 47. Cleveland, Miriam, 85. Coffin, Damaris (Gayer), 87. Coffin, Nathaniel, 87. Colburn's Mental Arithmetic, 101. Colburn, Mr., 93, 94. College Avenue, 14. College Hill, 6. Collier, Rev., William, 64, 66, 67, 72, 73, 90, 91, 92, 93, 96. Conant, Peter, 99. Concord, Mass., 87. Concord Street, 7. Coombs. Michael, 100. Cordis, Captain, 19. Cordis Street, 100. Court of Assistants, 77. Cox, Lemuel, 44. Cummings' First Lessons in Geography a
Historic leaves, volume 6, April, 1907 - January, 1908,
Union Square
and its neighborhood about the year 1846. (search)
e in the coal business on Park street, and was also station agent at the Fitchburg railroad Somerville station. East of the Bonners' came the home estate of Joseph Clark, brick maker, who had yards south of the Fitchburg railroad; he was a man of business ability, and at one time a selectman. Of his children, Mrs. Oren S. Knapbell, Mystic No. 6,a cast-off from Charlestown. On the southeast corner of these streets, and opposite the Joseph Clark house already mentioned, lived another Joseph Clark, father of one of our oldest residents, Joseph H. Clark, of Spring Hill. Mr. Clark's widow married Leonard Arnold, of whom I have already spoken. In this Claet. Much of the territory south of the railroad and a small piece north of it were occupied by brick yards, Mr. Hazeltine's, Clark Bennett's, G. W. Wyatt's, Joseph Clark's, and others. There were two one-story cottages south of the railroad and adjoining it, between Webster avenue and Prospect street, owned by Patrick Egan, an
Historic leaves, volume 6, April, 1907 - January, 1908, Original English inhabitants and early settlers in Somerville.—(Ii.) (search)
on in Somerville. The second person to name is Charles E. Gilman, who was town clerk in 1842 and the faithful town and city clerk forty-six years consecutively and till the time of his death. John C. Magoun was an assessor in 1842, and for thirty years subsequently. He was an overseer of the poor twenty-two years. Edmund Tufts was town treasurer and collector of taxes the first year, and the sum total that passed through his hands was $4,993.97. Other prominent men the first year were Nathan Tufts, Caleb W. Leland, Guy C. Hawkins, Alfred Allen, Levi Russell, Charles Miller, Francis Bowman, Columbus Tyler, Robert Vinal, Thomas J. Leland, Joseph Clark, Dr. Luther V. Bell, James Hill, Captain Edward Cutter, Fitch Cutter, Orr N. Towne, Colonel Samuel Jaques, of Ten Hills Farm renown, Clark Bennett, Samuel T. Frost, and George O. Brastow, all passed away. To continue the narrative down the generations would be foreign to my purpose and fail of historic interest, and I close the book.
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