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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 15: Worcester County. (search)
rd W. Newton; in 1862, Warren S. Bush, George H. Williams, John B. Parker, Richard W. Newton, William A. Bartlett, 2d; in 1863, Warren S. Bush, Richard W. Newton, William A. Bartlett, 2d, George G. Valentine, Warren E. Moore; in 1864 and 1865, Samuel Clark, George G. Valentine, William A. Bartlett, 2d, Warren E. Moore, William Burdett. The town-clerk during all the years of the war was Samuel Clark. The town-treasurer during the same period was John B. Crawford. 1861. When the President mSamuel Clark. The town-treasurer during the same period was John B. Crawford. 1861. When the President made his first call for troops, a citizens' meeting was immediately called. It met on the 17th of April, and was large and spirited. Rev. S. S. Ashley, Rev. Joseph Allen, D. D., George C. Davis, Wilder Bush, and Samuel Clarke were appointed to draft resolutions. They reported the following, which were unanimously adopted:— Resolved, That we, the citizens of Northborough, do hereby pledge to Liberty and our country our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor, and will give our united and
, s. of Jonas (3), was a goldsmith, and probably resided in Boston. He was living in 1705. Under date of Nov. 1, 1673, John Hull of Boston writes, I accepted Samuel Clark, s. of Jonas Clark, as an apprentice for eight years. 8. James, a housewright, was in Camb. as early as 1685. He was probably the same who m. Hannah Heath(John m. Mary Quincy, was a physician, and d. 1780, leaving sons John and Ebenezer); Martha, bap. 4 Aug. 1745, d. 10 Oct. 1746; Elizabeth, bap. 1 Nov. 1747, m. Samuel Clark, hatter, of Newport, and was living in 1786; Samuel, bap. 7 May 1749, d. 9 Aug. 1751; Samuel, bap. 20 May 1753, a printer, d.--May 1774; William, bap. 21 Sept.ed to Camb., and occupied the homestead. He was Representative 1682 and 1683. He was also elected a Ruling Elder of the Church here, to which office he and Elder Clark were ordained 15 Nov. 1682, when the Rev. Nathaniel Gookin was ordained pastor. He d. 5 May 1683, a. 64. His w. Anne and their ten children survived. A large po
Representatives, in the time of the Non-resident Act; and he discharged the duty of every employment with singular wisdom, diligence, and fidelity; and was esteemed among us as a pattern of every grace and virtue, a true and sincere lover of his country, and who took a singular pleasure in being useful to all about him. 7. Samuel, s. of Jonas (3), was a goldsmith, and probably resided in Boston. He was living in 1705. Under date of Nov. 1, 1673, John Hull of Boston writes, I accepted Samuel Clark, s. of Jonas Clark, as an apprentice for eight years. 8. James, a housewright, was in Camb. as early as 1685. He was probably the same who m. Hannah Heath 27 April 1681, in Roxbury, where their son James was b. 4 Feb. 1681-2, and where also the w. Hannah d. 30 May 1683. He m. in Camb. 24 Sept. 1685, Sarah, dau. of Samuel Champney, and had Sarah, b. 20 Sept. 1686, d. 13 Oct. 1707; Ebenezer, b. 31 July 1688, d. 7 Nov. 1688; Mercy, b. 18 Dec. 1690, m. Joseph Gibbs of Framingham 1 July
as living in 1786; John and Ebenezer, twins, b. 16 May 1743, both grad. H. C. 1765 (John m. Mary Quincy, was a physician, and d. 1780, leaving sons John and Ebenezer); Martha, bap. 4 Aug. 1745, d. 10 Oct. 1746; Elizabeth, bap. 1 Nov. 1747, m. Samuel Clark, hatter, of Newport, and was living in 1786; Samuel, bap. 7 May 1749, d. 9 Aug. 1751; Samuel, bap. 20 May 1753, a printer, d.--May 1774; William, bap. 21 Sept. 1755, d. 1 May 1758; Lydia, bap. 11 Mar. 1759, d. young. Mrs. Lydia Stedman d. 176y, and employed by the town in civil affairs. On the death of his father he returned to Camb., and occupied the homestead. He was Representative 1682 and 1683. He was also elected a Ruling Elder of the Church here, to which office he and Elder Clark were ordained 15 Nov. 1682, when the Rev. Nathaniel Gookin was ordained pastor. He d. 5 May 1683, a. 64. His w. Anne and their ten children survived. A large posterity of Elder Stone remains in Framingham, and in the region round about. 4.
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians, Caleb Rotheram, D. D. (search)
spices have most commonly been conducted. Mr. Clark was descended from a family which in all its faithful friend of all my advancing years. Dr. Clark published three excellent sermons On the Natwere a collection of detached aphorisms; and Dr. Clark has sometimes committed it, but not, perhapsfor health in a warmer climate, he entrusted Mr. Clark, at the early age of twenty-three, with the rmanently to supply his place, they rejected Mr. Clark, and appointed a successor of much more rigiticular system or creed. In the year 1757 Mr. Clark quitted the academy on being invited to beco of his friend Dr. Aikin. However competent Mr. Clark might have been, his refusal could hardly beilent, considering that God hath done it. Mr. Clark, it is believed, published nothing, except aofessor James Robertson of Edinburgh, and Mr. Samuel Clark, the subject of the preceding article, ob the death of Dr. Taylor, and the refusal of Mr. Clark, Mr. Aikin was unanimously chosen to fill th[11 more...]
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 4., Medford Historical Society. (search)
Burbank, Miss Ella L. Burbank, Miss Ida E. Buss, Charles B. Buss, Herman L. Chany, Miss A. Clara. Chandler, Dr. N. F. Chipman, Miss Bessie W. Clark, Miss Mary S. Clark, Miss Sarah L. Clark, Calvin. Cleaves, Dr. James E. Cleaves, Mrs. Emmie N. Coffin, Freeman C. Coburn, Charles F. Converse,Clark, Miss Sarah L. Clark, Calvin. Cleaves, Dr. James E. Cleaves, Mrs. Emmie N. Coffin, Freeman C. Coburn, Charles F. Converse, M. M. Cordis, Mrs. Adelaide E. Craig, William C. Crockett, George W. Croudis, George A. Croudis, Mrs. Mabel H. Cushing, Walter H. Cushing, Walter F. Cushing, Mrs. Carrie E. Cushing, Samuel. Cushing, Mrs. Samuel. Dalrymple, Willard. Dalrymple, Mrs. Julia W. Dame, Lorin L. Dame, Mrs. Isabel Clark, Calvin. Cleaves, Dr. James E. Cleaves, Mrs. Emmie N. Coffin, Freeman C. Coburn, Charles F. Converse, M. M. Cordis, Mrs. Adelaide E. Craig, William C. Crockett, George W. Croudis, George A. Croudis, Mrs. Mabel H. Cushing, Walter H. Cushing, Walter F. Cushing, Mrs. Carrie E. Cushing, Samuel. Cushing, Mrs. Samuel. Dalrymple, Willard. Dalrymple, Mrs. Julia W. Dame, Lorin L. Dame, Mrs. Isabel A. Davenport, George E. Davenport, Miss Viola T. Davis, Miss E. A. Dean, John Ward. Dean, Mrs. Lydia E. Delano, George S. Delong, Rev. Henry C. Delong, Mrs. Louise G. Dennison, Edward B. Dinsmore, Miss Jessie M. Doland, Henry B. Dunham, Charles B. Durgin, Miss Annie E. Eddy, Will C. Eddy
r. Cram, the pump-maker, lived in the low house just opposite Pleasant street. He was always in demand. Judah Loring's home was next above Mr. Cudworth's. He was a ship-carpenter, having a shop located near the present railroad crossing. Mr. Samuel Clark, who has just built a house on the site of Jonathan Sampson's homestead, came to Medford from Hanover in 1834 and was apprenticed to Edward Eells, a former ship-builder in Hanover who came to Medford in 1822 and did the joiner-work for many of the vessels built here. He died in 1838 and his son Robert L. succeeded him in business. Mr. Clark married the youngest daughter of Edward Eells in 1845 and lived many years in the old home. He is the only survivor of all the workers in the ship-yards living on this old street, and is in his eighty-fourth year. The long tenement house known as the Colleges still stands. How it ever came to have a name like that is not known. An old deed conveying the property from one John Cutter, of
Taking a Round. --William Hall appeared before the Mayor yesterday to answer the charge of assaulting and beating Samuel Clark on Saturday last. Sam testified that he was harnessing a horse at Ruskell's old stable, on Wall street, when the accused and Jerard Hall came up. Both being merry, Jerard interfered with his work, and Sam asked him to desist, but instead of doing so persisted in his annoyance till Sam took hold of and held him. Seeing his friend in a muss, Billy waded in, and the two together handled Sam without gloves. To atone for such treatment, both parties were arrested and bailed to appear before the Mayor, but when called yesterday Jerard came not, and his bond was forfeited. Billy, however, was held to bail to keep the peace and to answer an indictment by the next Grand Jury.
ery, Md.; Alfred, slave of John Hill. Richmond, Va.; Orange, slave of James N. Hill, St. Lawrence, Mo.; Frederick, slave of Betsy Bryding, Somerset, Md.; James, slave of John T. Wilson, Mason, Ky.; Thomas, slave of John Loates, Frederick, Md.; Thomas, slave of Mrs. Slocum, Dorchester, Md.; Edward, slave of Alfred Gordon, Charles co., Md.; Amos, slave of Mary A. Bower, Eastern Shore, Md.; Hiram, slave of B. Wyatt, Drew co., Ark.; Jesse, slave of Thos. Anderson, Marion, Mo.; John, slave of Samuel Clark, Kent co., Md.; George, slave of H. Hesth, Anderson dist., S. C.; Solomon, slave of W. Brewer, Montgomery, Md.; Calvin, slave of Abraham Gardner, Southampton, Va.; James, slave of J. F. Chaplain, Port Royal, S. C.; John, slave of George Rausser, Baltimore; Charles, slave of Miss Eva Fields, Prince George, Md.; Sam, slave of J. Green, Baltimore; Isaac, slave of James Connelly, Clarke co., Va.; William, slave of Hugh Delts, Parkersburg, Va.; Abraham, slave of Charles Stewart, Anderson, Md.;
Judge Lyons's Court. --The February term of Judge Lyons's Court commenced yesterday. The Grand Jury was sworn in, with John W. Purcell as foreman. After being charged by the Judge they retired, and at 3 o'clock came into court with indictments for felony against the following parties: Joseph Johnson, Frank Morris, aliasHerman, alias Meinham; Isaac Jacobs, Samuel Clark, Melissa J. Palmateure, George W. Berry, David Childrey, Asa Perrin (three cases), John Munn, Henry Smith, A. A. Thompson, William Daley and Catherine Collins. The Grand Jury were then discharged till Thursday. The cases of Johnson and Clarke will be tried to-day.