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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Iuka and Corinth. (search)
rom Bolivar. Even at this distant time memory lingers on the numerous incidents of distinguished bravery displayed by officers and men who fought splendidly on the first day, when we did not know what the enemy was going to do. Staff as well as line officers distinguished themselves while in action. The first day my presence was required on the main line, and the fighting in front of that did not so much come under my eye, but on the second day I was everywhere on the line of battle. Temple Clark of my staff was shot through the breast. My sabretasche strap was cut by a bullet, and my gloves were stained with the blood of a staff-officer wounded at my side. An alarm spread that I was killed, but it was soon stopped by my appearance on the field. Satisfied that the enemy was retreating, I ordered Sullivan's command to push him with a heavy skirmish line, and to keep constantly feeling them. I rode along the lines of the commands, told them that, having been moving and fightin
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of Corinth. (search)
rom Bolivar. Even at this distant time memory lingers on the numerous incidents of distinguished bravery displayed by officers and men who fought splendidly on the first day, when we did not know what the enemy was going to do. Staff as well as line officers distinguished themselves while in action. The first day my presence was required on the main line, and the fighting in front of that did not so much come under my eye, but on the second day I was everywhere on the line of battle. Temple Clark of my staff was shot through the breast. My sabretasche strap was cut by a bullet, and my gloves were stained with the blood of a staff-officer wounded at my side. An alarm spread that I was killed, but it was soon stopped by my appearance on the field. Satisfied that the enemy was retreating, I ordered Sullivan's command to push him with a heavy skirmish line, and to keep constantly feeling them. I rode along the lines of the commands, told them that, having been moving and fightin
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
th instant: On the morning of the 8th instant I assumed command of your brigade, by order, on account of your sickness. Your assistant adjutantgeneral, Capt. Temple Clark; your aide-de-camp, Lieutenant Lloyd, and two mounted orderlies reported to me for duty. Lieutenant Sprague, adjutant of the Eighth Wisconsin Volunteers, aoyd was nearly captured by the rebels in conveying the order to the Twenty-sixth Illinois Volunteers. The Eleventh Missouri Volunteers had been recalled by Capt. Temple Clark, assistant adjutantgeneral, after the main body had retired and the enemy had advanced, and just in time to save them from being cut off. General Palmer ordcannot speak in terms of too high praise. They were steady and cool at all times; perfectly under control. They deserve great credit. Your staff officers-Captain Clark and Lieutenant Lloyd-behaved gallantly, as did Lieutenant Sprague. I particularly call to your notice the service rendered and the gallant conduct generally o
, is our success due. I intended forwarding a list of our killed and wounded, but the mail will close ere I could copy it. I will endeavor to send it in a day or two. I presume that ere this the telegraph has informed you that General Rosecrans has been promoted to a Major-Generalship. Such is the case, and the double-starred epaulette could not grace a braver soldier or a more accomplished gentleman. Ere closing, I will take this opportunity of returning my sincere thanks to Capt. Temple Clark, Assistant Adjutant-General to Gen. Rosecrans, for his kindness in furnishing me with considerable of the material for this letter. A Bohemian himself, he is always ready and willing to lend a helping hand to a fellow-craftsman. This morning the troops of General Grant returned to Corinth, while the army of the Mississippi returned to this point, to be in readiness for a move toward Rienzi, which place has been menaced by Breckinridge and Van Dorn during the past two days. As soon
, is our success due. I intended forwarding a list of our killed and wounded, but the mail will close ere I could copy it. I will endeavor to send it in a day or two. I presume that ere this the telegraph has informed you that General Rosecrans has been promoted to a Major-Generalship. Such is the case, and the double-starred epaulette could not grace a braver soldier or a more accomplished gentleman. Ere closing, I will take this opportunity of returning my sincere thanks to Capt. Temple Clark, Assistant Adjutant-General to Gen. Rosecrans, for his kindness in furnishing me with considerable of the material for this letter. A Bohemian himself, he is always ready and willing to lend a helping hand to a fellow-craftsman. This morning the troops of General Grant returned to Corinth, while the army of the Mississippi returned to this point, to be in readiness for a move toward Rienzi, which place has been menaced by Breckinridge and Van Dorn during the past two days. As soon