hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 96 4 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 24 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 19 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 16 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 9 1 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 8 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 7 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Charles Clark or search for Charles Clark in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

participate in the assault, bravely maintained a new and hazardous position under fire from the gunboats and from the land-batteries of the enemy. Throughout this movement, Semmes' battery served efficiently. The First division, under Gen. Charles Clark, brigades of Colonel Hunt and Colonel Smith, advancing to the right of the Greenwell Springs road, made a gallant charge, constantly pressing the enemy back until, after several hours of fighting, he was driven to his last encampment. This of the penitentiary. It was here the division suffered the greatest loss. The fight had turned hot and stubborn. Colonel Hunt, commanding the Kentucky brigade, was shot down. At this juncture the attack was pressed with great vigor until General Clark received a wound, supposed at the time to be mortal. Through some misapprehension Hunt's brigade began to fall back down the slope, but still preserving order and obeying commands. Captain Buckner, of General Breckinridge's staff, had been
nac's brigade, the field was crossed under a murderous fire of artillery and musketry, the wood was reached and our little line sprang with a yell upon the foe. In this charge, General Mouton, commanding division, fell. Colonel Armant, of the Eighteenth Louisiana; Colonel Beard, of the Crescent (New Orleans) regiment; Lieutenant-Colonel Walker, commanding Twenty-eighth Louisiana; Lieutenant-Colonel Noble, Seventeenth Texas; Major Canfield of the Crescent regiment, were killed; and Lieutenant-Colonel Clark, Crescent regiment, dangerously wounded. Seven standard bearers fell, one after another, with the flag of the Crescent regiment. The consolidated Crescent regiment was the only Louisiana regiment that proved so unfortunate as to lose all its field officers in a single battle.—Report of Adjutant-General (Louisiana), 1892. Not once, in spite of these permanent losses, did this noble division halt for one instant, nor did it in face of the disaster fall into confusion. Polignac was