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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 38 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Frederick L. Clark or search for Frederick L. Clark in all documents.

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reek and at Waynesboro did the duty of a regiment, and deserves great praise. Captain Beebe, commanding the artillery, and his lieutenants, Stetson, Fowler, and Clark, have performed their duty well, and to the satisfaction of their immediate commanders. I cannot speak too highly of my staff. Through the exertions of Captain D, 1,245,211. T. G. Baylor, Captain and Chief of Ordnance, M. D.M. Report of animals captured and forage taken up and consumed, under the direction of Fred. L. Clark, Captain and Assistant Quartermaster, during the campaign against Savannah, Georgia: Date.By whom captured.Horses.Mules.Corn.Rice.Fodder. 1864, Novemby that the above is a correct report of animals captured, and forage taken up and consumed, under my direction, during the campaign against Savannah, Georgia. Fred. L. Clark, Captain and Assistant Quartermaster. Statement of casualties and prisoners captured by the army in the field, campaign of Georgia. command.killed.w
Jordon ; the Third Kentucky, Lieutenant-Colonel King; the Tenth Ohio, Fifth Ohio, and Ninth Michigan cavalry, at Waynesboro, December fourth, have all, at the various places mentioned, behaved most handsomely and attracted my special attention. The Second Kentucky cavalry, Captain Foreman, although but a detachment, at Buckhead Creek and at Waynesboro did the duty of a regiment, and deserves great praise. Captain Beebe, commanding the artillery, and his lieutenants, Stetson, Fowler, and Clark, have performed their duty well, and to the satisfaction of their immediate commanders. I cannot speak too highly of my staff. Through the exertions of Captain Dunbar, Assistant Quartermaster, and Brookfield, Commissary of Subsistence, my command has always been well supplied. Dr. Wise, Surgeon-in-Chief Division, Captains Brink (Inspector-General,) Day, (Provost-Marshal,) and my Aids, Captain Hayes, and Lieutenants Holling-worth, Oliver, Fuller, and Griffin, have each, in his respective p
, Twentieth corps. Starting at daylight of the same day, and moving in the direction of Lithonia, a small station on the Georgia Railroad, passing through the town of Decatur, at sundown we went into camp on a large plantation, formerly owned by Clark, and known as Clark's plantation, about fifteen miles from Atlanta. Remaining here until the evening of the twenty-third, we succeeded in loading about nine hundred wagons with forage and provisions within a radius of five miles. About dark the Clark's plantation, about fifteen miles from Atlanta. Remaining here until the evening of the twenty-third, we succeeded in loading about nine hundred wagons with forage and provisions within a radius of five miles. About dark the train was put in motion leading to Atlanta by Colonel Dustin, my battery acting as rear-guard as far as Decatur, where we arrived about four o'clock A. M. On the morning of the twenty-fourth, about seven o'clock A. M., we again started for Atlanta, acting as advance-guard, where we arrived about ten o'clock A. M., went into camp in our old camping-ground, where we remained until the morning of November thirteenth, when we were ordered by Major J. A. Reynolds to report to Brigadier-General Geary
in Company C, Commanding One Hundred and Ninth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers. G. W. Clark, Lieutenant and Acting Adjutant. Captain Clark's Report. Report of Animals captured and Forage taken up and consumed under direction of Frederick L. Clark, Captain and Assistant Quartermaster, during the campaign against Savannah, Georgia. Date.By whom Captured.Horses.Mules.Corn, pounds.Fodder, pounds.Rice, pounds. Nov. and Q. M. Department and Dec. Ordnance Supply Train.204095,000175,000istant Quartermaster, during the campaign against Savannah, Georgia. Date.By whom Captured.Horses.Mules.Corn, pounds.Fodder, pounds.Rice, pounds. Nov. and Q. M. Department and Dec. Ordnance Supply Train.204095,000175,00015,000 Total captured,204095,000175,00015,000 I certify that the above is a correct report of animals captured and forage taken up and consumed under my direction, during the campaign against Savannah, Georgia. Frederick L. Clark, Captain and Assistant Quartermaster.
he having performed the duties of that grade during the engagement. The forward officers, boatswain Hasker, gunner Oliver, and carpenter Lindsey, discharged well all the duties required of them. The boat-swain had charge of a gun, and fought it well. The gunner was indefatigable in his efforts; his experience and exertions as a gunner have contributed very materially to the efficiency of the battery. Acting Master Parrish was assisted in piloting the ship by pilots Wright, Williams, Clark, and Cunningham. They were necessarily much exposed. It is now due that I should mention my personal staff. To that gallant young officer Flag Lieutenant Minor, I am much indebted for his promptness in the execution of signals; for renewing the flag-staffs when shot away — being thereby greatly exposed; for his watchfulness in keeping the confederate flag up; his alacrity in conveying my orders to the different divisions; and for his general cool and gallant bearing. My aid, Acting M
r Captains Carter, Hardaway, Bondurant, Rhett, Clark, Peyton, and Nelson, were all engaged at one tP. Jones, with his battalion, the batteries of Clark, Peyton, and Rhett, temporarily assigned as a nd Georgia were still posted, supported by Colonels Clark and Ramseur's regiments of North Carolina nd the Twenty-second Georgia, supported by Colonels Clark and Ransom's North Carolina troops, to advssigned, with the batteries of Captains Rhett, Clark, and Peyton, (that of the latter under command by one of the enemy's redoubts, I ordered Captain Clark to this position. Here, with other batterth a battery of the enemy. I also ordered Captain Clark and Lieutenant Fry to bring their batterieng between the enemy's and our batteries. Captain Clark and Lieutenant Fry were still held in reseded thirteen hundred and twenty rounds. Captain Clark lost one man killed and five wounded; two wheels were seriously damaged. Captain Clark, at Mechanicsville and White Oak Swamp, expended th