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Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 63 3 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 42 2 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 26 6 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 24 2 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 23 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 20 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 16 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 13 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4. You can also browse the collection for James Freeman Clarke or search for James Freeman Clarke in all documents.

Your search returned 16 results in 5 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 44: Secession.—schemes of compromise.—Civil War.—Chairman of foreign relations Committee.—Dr. Lieber.—November, 1860April, 1861. (search)
12, Dec. 12, 1860; Jan. 24, 1861), a conservative journal, published leaders of the same tenor as the Tribune's articles. Among Sumner's correspondents who favored non-resistance to secession were Dr. Samuel G. Howe, John G. Whittier, Rev. James Freeman Clarke, and Rev. John Pierpont. Mr. Clarke published an anonymous pamphlet at the time (a letter addressed to Sumner) on Secession, Concession, or Self-Possession, in which he said: We cannot coerce a State to remain in the Union against its wMr. Clarke published an anonymous pamphlet at the time (a letter addressed to Sumner) on Secession, Concession, or Self-Possession, in which he said: We cannot coerce a State to remain in the Union against its will; we must not attempt to do this. Whittier's poem (Jan. 16, 1861), A Word for the Hour, is in the same vein. He wrote Sumner, March 13, 1861: The conflicting rumors from Washington trouble me. I am for peace, not by conceding our principles, but by simply telling the slave States go, —border ones and all. I believe in the irrepressible conflict. Wendell Phillips, in a passionate harangue, affirmed the right of the slave States, upon the principles of 1776, to decide the question of a separ
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 45: an antislavery policy.—the Trent case.—Theories of reconstruction.—confiscation.—the session of 1861-1862. (search)
ere were others who, though respecting the speaker and agreeing with the ends lie sought, felt that the time had not come for that open and direct assault on slavery which he advocated. The resolutions were silent on the subject; and the Rev. James Freeman Clarke's effort to add to them declarations corresponding with the speech, though not reaching a vote, disclosed a strong opposition. It is uncertain what their fate would have been on a division. Among the delegates there were, it is quitrogress of events and the development of opinion among war Democrats; R. H. Dana, Jr., signified his dissent (Adams's Biography of Dana, vol. II. pp. 259, 260; Boston Advertiser, October 26); and even Governor Andrew regarded both Sumner's and Dr. Clarke's action as untimely. The Boston Advertiser, October 4, called Sumner's an unfortunate speech. Sumner's citations from Greek and Roman history underwent criticism in newspaper articles, the tone of which disclosed that the writers were les
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 56: San Domingo again.—the senator's first speech.—return of the angina pectoris.—Fish's insult in the Motley Papers.— the senator's removal from the foreign relations committee.—pretexts for the remioval.—second speech against the San Domingo scheme.—the treaty of Washington.—Sumner and Wilson against Butler for governor.—1870-1871. (search)
t I walk too fast, and is averse to walking at all. Sumner made a brief visit to Mr. Hooper at Cotuit, and was for a day with B. P. Poore at Newbury. On September 23 he assisted at the Bird Club in commemorating the Whig State convention of 1846, in which he was a leader of the Conscience Whigs at the opening of his career. One evening in the autumn he was at Mrs. Sargent's Radical Club, where M. Coquerel, the French clergyman, was received, and where were also Wendell Phillips and James Freeman Clarke. He was glad to entertain with a dinner and a drive Forney and Daniel Dougherty He had introduced Mr. Dougherty at a lecture, February 7, at Lincoln Hall in Washington. on their visit to Boston. The former wrote, after his return to Philadelphia: It was a never-to-beforgotten evening,—one which it would give me rare satisfaction to be permitted to describe in my own volumes; and he communicated Dougherty's enthusiasm in recalling the meeting of the three friends in Boston. Sumne
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 57: attempts to reconcile the President and the senator.—ineligibility of the President for a second term.—the Civil-rights Bill.—sale of arms to France.—the liberal Republican party: Horace Greeley its candidate adopted by the Democrats.—Sumner's reserve.—his relations with Republican friends and his colleague.—speech against the President.—support of Greeley.—last journey to Europe.—a meeting with Motley.—a night with John Bright.—the President's re-election.—1871-1872. (search)
ier thought him unduly severe in the tone and temper of his speech,—a feature which in his judgment diminished its effect; but he as well as Mrs. Child and James Freeman Clarke vindicated in letters to public journals his sincerity and right to be heard. Boston Transcript, June 5, 6; Boston Journal, July 2. Wendell Phillips wroe-election, wrote, with friendly expressions: I am free to express my indignation at the onslaught which it has pleased Mr. Lloyd Garrison to make on you. James Freeman Clarke wrote: I do not know that I agree with you about Grant, but I admire your courage in expressing your opinions openly, and in spite of the partisan clamor ong in 1880 against General Grant's candidacy were President Woolsey, Thurlow Weed, Murat Hastead, E. R. Hoar, Henry L. Pierce, Rev. Henry W. Bellows, and Rev. James Freeman Clarke. For articles and opinions adverse to a third term, see New York Nation, Aug. 22, 1878, Oct. 16, 1879; Boston Transcript, Jan. 21, 1880 (containing opin
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 58: the battle-flag resolution.—the censure by the Massachusetts Legislature.—the return of the angina pectoris. —absence from the senate.—proofs of popular favor.— last meetings with friends and constituents.—the Virginius case.—European friends recalled.—1872-1873. (search)
it was their purpose to keep him in the Senate. Rev. James Freeman Clarke promptly denounced from his pulpit the legislativby Ex-Governor Emory Washburn the jurist, and by Rev. James Freeman Clarke. An erroneous statement is made in the Reministies for the purpose. He wrote on Christmas Day to James Freeman Clarke, who had three days before in a sermon sharply condympathetic circle, which included Wendell Phillips, James Freeman Clarke, and T. W. Higginson, he listened to John Weiss's pOne evening Sumner took tea at Jamaica Plain with Rev. James Freeman Clarke's family, where he talked of his last visit to Paial meeting, to which he had been invited by the pastor, Dr. Clarke. Mrs. Clarke writes as follows:— While on his way Mrs. Clarke writes as follows:— While on his way to the church he asked a gentleman in the streetcar about the exact locality. The gentleman told him, and then said, in a toto have been born. I have taken these extracts from Mr. Clarke's sketch of Charles Sumner in his work entitled Memorial