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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 56 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 28 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 26 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 7. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 8 0 Browse Search
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 6 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 6 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Thomas Clarkson or search for Thomas Clarkson in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 4 document sections:

Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
tive Committee of the British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society. The Sabbath [Chardon-Street] Convention, wrote Collins to Mr. Garrison, from Ipswich, the home of Clarkson, on January 1, 1841, has completely changed the issue. Woman's rights and non-governmentism are quite respectable when compared to your religious views. Ms. In a recent interview, procured with much difficulty, and only in an unofficial capacity, with Clarkson, his family were unwilling to have Collins touch on the subject of the division among the American abolitionists. Allusion to this or to Mr. Garrison led the venerable philanthropist to speak of the evils resulting from destroyinatory of its nature and doings, and these resolutions were from his pen. He also prevented any notice being taken, by way of reply, of a Sabbatarian letter from Clarkson, which Nathaniel Colver had craftily procured, and introduced at the earliest moment. The snare was too obviously meant—on the one hand for Mr. Garrison himself
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 6: third mission to England.—1846. (search)
and demolishes the pro-slavery Evangelical Alliance. He pays a last visit to Clarkson, who shortly dies. At the annual meeting of the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery erful reinforcement to the movement, to which rallied also, across the border, Clarkson and George Thompson, and Lib. 15.83. the Chartist leader, Henry Vincent. To g to his most advanced strategy for the destruction of slavery. To disunion Clarkson gave ready assent as soon as it was presented to him by Henry C. Wright (Ms. April 23, 1845, Clarkson to Wright). The noble old man wrote to this American friend on Oct. 24, 1845, when he had been for nearly a year confined to his bedroom—Neveuincy in Faneuil Hall on Mr. Garrison's return, touching these coincidences of Clarkson and Wilberforce (Lib. 16: 202). It is a fact for a poet to celebrate, wrote S.nd on his return, that you should have been in England to attend the burial of Clarkson, as you were of his co-worker Wilberforce. Lib. 16.194. But in this particula
ction to the House of Commons, was called upon by the West India interest, some fifty or sixty strong, who said, O'Connell, you have been accustomed to act with Clarkson and Wilberforce, Lushington and Brougham, to speak on the platform of Freemasons' Hall and advocate what is called the abolition cause. Mark this! If you will ounce the Gospel. They will never renounce the Gospel ( Letter to Louis Kossuth, p. 38; Lib. 21: 126). and Lafayette; In the Liberty Bell for 1846, p. 64, Thomas Clarkson, describing to Mrs. Chapman his intimacy with Lafayette, reported him to have said, frequently, I would never have drawn my sword in the cause of America if possessed, as a balance to these, conciliation, good nature, benevolence, or even a certain popular mirthfulness; had he possessed the moderation and urbanity of Clarkson, or the deep piety of Wilberforce, he had been the one man of our age. These all he lacked. Had the disease of America needed only counter-irritation, no better
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 20: Abraham Lincoln.—1860. (search)
ume of the Liberator with these words, suggested by the political situation: All Union-saving efforts are simply idiotic. At last, the covenant with death is annulled, and the agreement with hell broken—at least by the action of South Carolina, and ere long by all the slaveholding States, for their doom is one. Joy! But, alas! not by Northern manhood, conscience, church, and clergy; not by measures projected against slavery in the States, or even by the election of a President troubled by the compromises of the Constitution and eager to amend them away; not by one single act or threat of the political anti-slavery party, as a unit, in contravention of the Constitution; but, on the one hand, by the simple fidelity of a remnant pledged to eternal hostility to slavery wherever found and legalized, and to incessant agitation—on the other, by the sheer wickedness and dementia of the short-sighted Slave Power— The bloody Writing is forever torn. Wordsworth's Sonnet to Clarkson