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Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.). You can also browse the collection for M. Clausewitz or search for M. Clausewitz in all documents.

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Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Advertisement (search)
s. A year after the publication of this analytical table, the Prussian General Clausewitz died, leaving to his widow the care of publishing posthumous works which ded that he would have rendered to it some justice. One cannot deny to General Clausewitz great learning and a facile pen; but this pen, at times a little vagrant,ixing your opinions upon all the operations of war? At the same epoch when Clausewitz seemed thus to apply himself to sapping the basis of the science, a work of aress made in the science for the last thirty years, with the incredulity of M. Clausewitz, I believe I am correct in concluding that the ensemble of my principles annes of General Muffling, the partial relations of Generals Pelet, Boutourlin, Clausewitz, The works of Clausewitz have been incontestably useful, although it is ofClausewitz have been incontestably useful, although it is often less by the ideas of the author, than by the contrary ideas to which he gives birth. They would have been more useful still, if a pretentious and pedantic style
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 3: strategy. (search)
. And if, instead of pushing Bellegarde upon Lombardy by the Valteline, the Aulic Council had made him march upon Berne, or unite with the Arch-Duke, all would have been over with Massena. Those events seem then to prove that, if countries with high mountains are favorable to a tactical defense, it is not the same for a strategical defense, which, obliged to be disseminated, must seek a remedy for this inconvenience by augmenting its mobility, and by passing often to the offensive. General Clausewitz, whose logic is frequently at fault, pretends on the contrary, that, motion being the difficult part of mountain warfare, the defender ought to avoid the least movement, under the penalty of losing the advantage of local defenses. Meanwhile he finishes by demonstrating, himself, that the passive defense must succumb, sooner or later, under an active attack, which tends to prove that the initiative is not less favorable in the mountains than in the plains. If it could be doubted, the
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 4: grand tactics, and battles. (search)
rt; the kind of order of battle adopted, the wisdom of its measures of execution, the more or less loyal and enlightened concurrence of the lieutenants of the generalissimo, the cause of the struggle, the enthusiasm, the proportions and the quality of the troops, the superiority in artillery or in cavalry, and their good employment, but above all the moral condition of armies and even of nations, are what give victories more or less decisive, and determine their results. Therefore has General Clausewitz advanced a great sophism in telling us that without turning manoeuvres, a battle could not procure a complete victory. That of Zama saw perish in a few hours, the fruit of twenty years of glory and success of Hannibal, without any one having thought of turning him. At Rivoli the turners were completely beaten, and they were not more happy either at Stockach in 1799, or at Austerlitz in 1805. As will be seen in Art. 33, I am far from rejecting manoeuvres tending to outflank and to tur
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 6: logistics, or the practical art of moving armies. (search)
, it is necessary to read them in the works of Mm. C. de W. and Ruhle de Lilienstern, (Operations plan an Bericht eines Augenzeugen..) If I recall this circumstance, already more than once cited, it is not a feeling of vanity which leads me to it, because I would have other citations of this nature to make; but I have only desired to demonstrate that we may often act in war after problems well considered, without pausing too long at the details of the movements of our adversary. If General Clausewitz had been as often as myself in the position to weigh these problems, and see them resolved, he would not so much have doubted the efficacy of the theories of war founded upon principles, for it is those theories which alone will be able to serve as a guide for such solutions. His three volumes upon war prove evidently that in a situation like that in which the Duke of Brunswick was found in 1806, he would have been quite as embarrassed as he was as to the course which it was necessary
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), chapter 7 (search)
fault of throwing a whole army in a vast forest without being master of the issues, either of the front or of the flanks; but he must never have seen a combat who denies the incontestable importance of the possession of a wood situated in proximity with a line that he wishes to defend or attack. The part which the park Hougeumont played in the battle of Waterloo is a great example of the influence that a post well chosen and well defended can have in a combat; in advancing his paradox, M. Clausewitz had forgotten the importance which woods had in the battles of Hochkirch and of Kollin. But we have already dwelt too long upon this chapter of the infantry, it is time to speak of other arms. Article XLV: the cavalry. The formation of the cavalry, subjected to nearly the same controversies as that of the infantry, has been subjected also to the same uncertainty, and the too much vaunted treatise of the Count de Bismark, has not done much to clear them up. As we have been scar