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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 295 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 229 1 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery. 164 0 Browse Search
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune 120 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 78 0 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 66 2 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 60 0 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 54 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 51 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 40 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 19, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Henry Clay or search for Henry Clay in all documents.

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Lincoln promises to learn. In Lincoln's Pittsburg speech he says: "I must confess I do not understand the Tariff subject in all its multiform bearings, but I promise you I will give it my closest attention and endeavor to comprehend it fully." Imagine Daniel Webster, Henry Clay, John C. Calhoun, or even an ordinary member of Congress, confessing to their constituents on their way to Washington, that they did not understand the Tariff subject, but would endeavor to comprehend it after they got to Washington! It would be well if Abraham had nothing else to learn besides the Tariff. When he arrives at Washington, he will have to "comprehend" that "coercion" is easier to talk of than practice, and that a man of half sense can never rule in such times as these over a whole country.
at where once the Father of his Country sat! But the last impudent of all his balderdash a text he should say that Henry Clay was a teacher. Did Clay teach him to keep his mouth shut when it ought to be opened; or when opened. You see like, toClay teach him to keep his mouth shut when it ought to be opened; or when opened. You see like, to ask a dozen foolish questions in the place of giving some disclose a of his course as the President, in a few days to take the reins of government?--Henry Clay the teacher! and I am, says the Red Splitter, his (Clay's) Follower! And so that conteHenry Clay the teacher! and I am, says the Red Splitter, his (Clay's) Follower! And so that contemptible cur that trots under one of your mountain wagons, with six of your mighty monster wagon horses. The cur follows, but what is his strength and what his ability to get that wagon out of the mud? He only barks and bites if he can, and so will Clay's) Follower! And so that contemptible cur that trots under one of your mountain wagons, with six of your mighty monster wagon horses. The cur follows, but what is his strength and what his ability to get that wagon out of the mud? He only barks and bites if he can, and so will your President. But I am sick at the stomach. I'll stop. I have nothing particularly interesting from the military, only that new recruits are continually coming in, and our streets are enlivened with martial music hourly, and defensive prepar