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John F. Hume, The abolitionists together with personal memories of the struggle for human rights, Chapter 1: Theodore Roosevelt and the Abolitionists (search)
ng the saloon-keepers themselves, the most efficient allies on whom intemperance and the liquor traffic can count. Anti-Slavery men like Giddings, who supported Clay, were doing a thousandfold more effective work for the cause they had at heart than all the voters who supported Birney; or, to speak more accurately, they were doing all they could to advance the cause, while the others were doing all they could to hold it back. Lincoln in 1860 occupied more nearly the ground held by Clay than that held by Birney; and the men who supported the latter in 1844 were the prototypes of those who worked to oppose Lincoln in 1860, and only worked less hard becauey actually did tell them. But as the Abolitionists, four years earlier, in the same way defeated the Whigs when they were supporting a slaveholder from Kentucky (Clay), and a man who, in his time, did more for the upbuilding of slavery than any other person in America, it would appear that the score of responsibility on their pa
C., 202. Carlisle, Earl of, 18. Chapman, Mrs. Henry, 33. Charcoals, Missouri, 159; delegation to President, 162, 166; fight for Free Missouri, 162; appeal to President for protection, 166-168. Chase, Salmon P., 10, 13, 14, 59-61, 148, 205; financial policy, 60; espousal of Abolitionism, 61; and third party, 64; election to United States Senate, 206. Child, David Lee, 204. Child, Lydia Maria, 204. Chittenden, L. E., 134. Churchill's Crisis, 157. Civil War, 11; due to Abolitionists, 12. Clay, Henry, 2, 6. Claybanks, 159; exclusion from National Convention, 169. Coffin, Joshua, 201. Coffin, Levi, 197-198; President of the Underground railroad, 97. Colonization, 128-135; Society, 128; and England, 130-132; Lincoln's opinion, 133; experiments, 133-134. Colonizationists, pretended friendship for negroes, 130. Compromise of 1850, 6. Conover, A. J., 205. Cotton-gin, invention of, 31. Cox, Abram L., 203, 205. Crandall, Prudence, persecution of, 116-117. Crandall, Dr. Reuben,