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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for J. Randolph Clay or search for J. Randolph Clay in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 21: Germany.—October, 1839, to March, 1840.—Age, 28-29. (search)
I cannot express my grief at this account, and my indignation at the managers of that boat. And the Great Archer has been shooting his arrows across my path, before and behind. The Allgemeine Zeitung, a few days since, announced the death of Mrs. Clay, the wife of our Secretary at Vienna, J. Randolph Clay, afterwards Minister to Peru. He and Sumner seem to have become much interested in each other during their brief intercourse in Vienna. whom I came to know quite well during my stay theJ. Randolph Clay, afterwards Minister to Peru. He and Sumner seem to have become much interested in each other during their brief intercourse in Vienna. whom I came to know quite well during my stay there. She was an Englishwoman,—beautiful, graceful, and accomplished. At Prince Metternich's I thought her among the most beautiful. She has died young, leaving two children. And then there was old Mr. Justice Vaughan. I think that he loved me. He showed me the greatest marks of confidence. He often talked with me about cases before him, even asked my opinion; and, when I left for the Continent, made me promise to write him. I was on the point of doing it when I heard of his death. I am gla
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 23: return to his profession.—1840-41.—Age, 29-30. (search)
cabin. He took no interest in the distinctive measures of the Whig party, and had no sentimental regard for it; but he thought well of its two conspicuous chiefs, Clay and Webster. On the other hand, he was repelled by the low tone of the Democratic leaders, among whom Amos Kendall and Isaac Hill were then prominent. He is supp Julius, he also received tidings, —particularly from Mittermaier, who wrote in German. Fay kept him informed of society in Berlin, and of German politics. J. Randolph Clay wrote from Vienna of affairs in Eastern Europe. His brother George wrote of the public men and politics of France and other countries which he visited. Mar of 1812, and an alleged victory at Tippecanoe; and the vulgar appeal is made, grounded on military success. This has made him a more acceptable candidate than Clay or Webster, who have been serving the State well for years. Harrison lives in the State of Ohio, cultivating his farm with his own hands; and, as what is called h