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The Daily Dispatch: February 16, 1864., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 16, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for J. W. Clay or search for J. W. Clay in all documents.

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Confederate States Congress. The proceedings of the Senate yesterday, were opened with prayer by the Rev. J. L. Burrows. Mr. Johnson, of Ark., introduced a joint resolution of thanks to Gen. E. Kirby Smith and the officers and men under his command, for the battle of Richmond, Kentucky, which were passed unanimously. The special order, the bill to limit and define the term of office of the heads of executive departments, was on motion of Mr. Clay, postponed till the following day. Mr. Henry, of Tenn., introduced a bill to establish the Confederate flag. Put on the calendar. House bill to facilitate the collection of the claims of deceased soldiers, was referred to the Judiciary Committee. The Senate, on motion of Mr. Hill, of Ga., receded from its amendment to the House bill fixing the salaries of the clerks of Government depositories. House joint resolution for the relief of Major William F. Hines, was considered and concurred in. Senate bill
t Gen Sherman and staff have taken full possession of Mr. Beirne's, with the furniture pictures, &c., occupying it as headquarters, and the portion of Mr. B's family at home being thus compelled to seek a home with friends. Gen. Smith has made Gov. Clay's residence his headquarters, leaving but two rooms for the use of the family, and a portion of J. W. Clay's residence is similarly occupied. The country on the south side of the Memphis and Charleston Railroad, from Morrisville to Bridgepd a portion of J. W. Clay's residence is similarly occupied. The country on the south side of the Memphis and Charleston Railroad, from Morrisville to Bridgeport, is occupied with Federal troops. There are said to be about 13 regiments in and around Huntsville. The timber in the vicinity is freely used for fuel; in fact, everything desired is taken without limitation, and should they continue until April great suffering amongst the resident population must be the inevitable consequence.