hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 24 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 24 results in 2 document sections:

Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 19: battle of Chickamauga (search)
HindmanAnderson, Deas, Manigault3 Hill, D. H.CleburneWood, Polk, Deshler3 BreckenridgeHelm, Adams, moved to the attack and was soon followed by Cleburne. These two divisions were unfortunately plac the battle until late in the afternoon. Had Cleburne's division been behind this division in suppoades front, with the aid of Wood's brigade of Cleburne's division on its right. The four brigades, 6426475391,914 Total2691,458991,8265,621 Hill Cleburne Wood966802778Not giv. Polk524932547Not ghe afternoon and night, Hardee had intrenched Cleburne's division and prepared to make a desperate sle force had been fought to a standstill, and Cleburne held his position intact and with very little Sherman had been fought to a standstill, and Cleburne had no need for reenforcements. Also, Thomasg the line except at the extreme right, where Cleburne and the troops opposing Sherman still held the. They were heaviest where Sherman attacked Cleburne's and Breckenridge's divisions, but even ther
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 23: the fall of 1864 (search)
which marched to Spring Hill on the Franklin pike, 12 miles in Schofield's rear, arriving about 3 P. M. This place was held by the 2d division of the 4th corps, about 4000 strong; Hood's force was about 18,000 infantry. Hood took Cheatham with Cleburne, a division commander, within sight of the pike, along which the enemy could now be seen retreating at double-quick, with wagons in a trot, and gave explicit orders for an immediate attack and occupation of the pike. Similar orders, too, were g killed outright on the field, over 20 per cent were carried to hospitals with severe wounds, and as many more suffered less severe wounds or were captured. The loss of general officers was unparalleled on either side in any action of the war. Cleburne, Gist, Adams, Strahl, and Granberrty were killed; Brown, Carter, Manigault, Quarles, Cockrell, and Scott were wounded, and Gordon was captured. Fifty-three regimental commanders were killed, wounded, or captured. The result might have been dif