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James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 224 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 170 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 121 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 93 1 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 89 1 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 61 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 58 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 51 5 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 35 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 35 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for P. R. Cleburne or search for P. R. Cleburne in all documents.

Your search returned 18 results in 6 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
eing to furnish copies of the letters of Generals Lee and Cooper. We regret that we were led into this mistake by the friend who sent us the paper. We are always careful to have a responsible name attached to everything we publish, and this is the first instance in which we have gotten the wrong name. Major Irving A. Buck, of Baltimore, the name signed to the paper, and not Major Brock, the name which the printers put at the head of it, was the author of the interesting sketch of Cleburne and his division at Missionary Ridge and Ringgold Gap, which we published in our last number. These mistakes in names are very annoying, and we felicitate ourselves that they do not occur often. The Louisiana division, A. N. V., had, we judge from the reports, a most delightful reunion and banquet in New Orleans on the 21st, and we deeply regretted our inability to accept a kind invitation to be present on the occasion. We are glad to learn that their monument scheme has been so e
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of General M. P. Lowry of battle of Taylor's Ridge. (search)
nnel Hill, December 3, 1863. Captain I. A. Buck, A. A. General: Sir,--I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by my brigade, on Taylor's Ridge, in the battle of the 27th November, 1863: Early in the morning Major-General Cleburne called on me for my smallest regiment, to be placed on the mountain to the left of the gap, through which the railroad and wagon road passed, leading out from Ringgold in the direction of Tunnel Hill. I sent the Sixteenth Alabama regiment and Captain Palmer, A. A. General, to place them in position. My other three regiments were then placed in the gap. After the skirmishing had commenced between Smith's brigade and the enemy, Major-General Cleburne informed me that the enemy was moving in force to his right and he wished me to go on the ridge to the right and protect his right flank. I moved my brigade at once by the right flank, and after ascending the hill I heard firing several hundred yards to the right, and, leaving a st
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General P. R. Cleburne's report of battle of Ringgold Gap. (search)
General P. R. Cleburne's report of battle of Ringgold Gap. Headquarters Cleburne's division, Tunnell Hill, Ga., Dec. 9, 1863. Colonel,--On the retreat of the Army of Tennessee, from Missionary Ridge, Tennessee, to Ringgold, Ga., my divisionCleburne's division, Tunnell Hill, Ga., Dec. 9, 1863. Colonel,--On the retreat of the Army of Tennessee, from Missionary Ridge, Tennessee, to Ringgold, Ga., my division covered the retreat of Hardee's corps, arriving safely on the west bank of the East Chicamauga river at 10 o'clock, P. M., on the 26th November. At this point the river had to be forded. It was nearly waist deep and the night was freezing cold. Igs there. Will you be good enough to report fully. Respectfully, (Signed), Geo. W. Brent, A. A. General. Major-General Cleburne. Leaving staff officers to conduct the troops across the river to the position designated, I went forward mysndered me all the assistance in his power. He selected and reformed the new line, after we withdrew from our first position. Respectfully, your obedient servant, P. R. Cleburne, Major General Colonel Geo. Wm. Brent, A. A. G., Army of Tennessee.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Kirby Smith's campaign in Kentucky in 1862. (search)
eral Smith, at this time in Kentucky, consisted of Cleburne's and Churchill's divisions, six thousand men, in evere loss. On the morning of the 27th of August, Cleburne's and Churchill's divisions moved forward to suppole river by noon. Churchill's division was there, Cleburne's a few miles beyond. Hitherto the country was l importance that the position should be held, and Cleburne was ordered to move to Scott's assistance as rapidr movements were unknown or misinterpreted. General Cleburne was forming his men in line of battle when we tucky, teeming with inexhaustable supplies. General Cleburne was ordered to attack at daylight. So far frohmond turnpike, with the artillery in the centre. Cleburne's division was formed in line of battle on the rigt, retired to the position originally designated. Cleburne was apprised of Churchill's movement, and ordered er-General Preston Smith, upon whom the command of Cleburne's division had devolved, (that officer having been
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Kirby Smith's Kentucky campaign. (search)
connoissance en force. General Smith repaired to Frankfort on the afternoon of the 2nd of October, and concentrated his army there. Stevenson, with 11,000 men, arrived that night. Heth, with 7,000 men, came up from Georgetown almost at the same time. Brigadier-General Davis had been stationed at Frankfort, with two regiments, for some time. Gracie, with one regiment and a battalion, was at Lexington, while Humphrey Marshall, with his brigade, 4,500 men, was ordered from Owingsville, and Cleburne, retiring from Shelbyville before the overwhelming forces of the enemy, fell back to Frankfort. Thus, in a very short time, three and twenty thousand veteran soldiers were collected at Frankford, with 5,000 more within supporting distance. General Bragg's army, 22,000 strong, was still at Bardstown. The enemy emerged from Louisville in three coloumns; one in the direction of Bardstown, another by Shelbyville, on Frankfort, and a third upon Taylorsville, apparently for the purpose of in
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Kennesaw Mountain. (search)
the road from Gilgath church to Marietta. From this road Hardee extended the line nearly south, covering Marietta on the west, the left of my division was fixed on the Marietta road; thence it ran up the spur of the mountain called Little Kennesaw, and thence to the top of same and on up to the top of Big Kennesaw, connecting with General Walthall. Featherstone was on the right of Walthall, and joined General Hood's left; Walker, of Hardee's corps, was on my left; then in order came Bate, Cleburne and Cheatham. Kennesaw Mountain is about four miles northwest of Marietta. It is over two-and-a-half miles in length, and rises abruptly from the plain, solitary and alone, to the height of perhaps 600 or 700 feet. Its western side is rocky and abrupt. Its eastern side can, in a few places, be gained on horseback, and the west of Little Kennesaw, being bald and destitute of timber, affords a commanding view of all the surrounding country as far as the eye can reach, except where the v