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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 81 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 58 2 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 23 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 4, 1863., [Electronic resource] 13 1 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 12 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for Pat Cleburne or search for Pat Cleburne in all documents.

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ord, and they wondered why it didn't come. But, when it didn't come, I knew Pat Cleburne was dead; for, if he had been living, he would have given that order. And, In pursuance of this policy, on the 9th of November General Johnston sent Colonel Cleburne, with 1,200 infantry, half a section of artillery, and a squadron of Terrye the impression in the country that this force is only an advanced guard. Cleburne marched as directed, but the Federals did not wait for him. They moved off at he Southern troops, hid in the woods or collected in crowds, imploring mercy. Cleburne says: Everybody fled at our approach; but two people were left in Tompkiting the fact. A few articles were stolen by teamsters or camp-followers; but Cleburne at once paid for them out of his own pocket. This conduct reassured the people, and he found a very good feeling on his return. This reconnaissance of Cleburne, and other movements of troops, produced the effect intended. Sherman was grea